Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Clinicians Develop New Decision Aid Tool To Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Date:
October 15, 2009
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
Clinicians and designers, along with colleagues from other institutions, have developed and tested a tool to involve patients more in their diabetes treatment and medication choices. The tool, a set of decision aid cards, could help patients make decisions involving their disease and perhaps lead to better outcomes.

Mayo Clinic clinicians and designers, along with colleagues from other institutions, have developed and tested a tool to involve patients more in their diabetes treatment and medication choices. The tool, a set of decision aid cards, could help patients make decisions involving their disease and perhaps lead to better outcomes. The results of this randomized trial are in September's issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

Victor Montori, M.D., a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist in Rochester, is co-author of the study. He heads the Knowledge Encounter Research Unit (KER) in the Department of Medicine and is a member of the Center for Innovation at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. You can watch Dr. Montori and study coordinator Rebecca Mullan discuss the trial on this video on YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60d0RmQtw6k).

The trial was conducted at 11 primary care and family medicine sites within Mayo Health System and Olmsted Medical Center, all in southeast Minnesota. Twenty-one clinicians and eighty-five patients participated in the trial with thirty-seven patients receiving "usual care" and forty-eight patients using the decision aid cards. Health care clinicians, consisting of physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners, were responsible for managing diabetes in adult patients with medication options. The Diabetes Medication Choice decision aid cards were used to help patients and their clinician reach a decision regarding their course of care.

The cards were created by an innovative team of patients, clinicians, educators and designers. The tool consists of six cards that describe the possible effects of various medication choices on six outcomes: weight change, low blood sugar, blood sugar, daily routine, daily sugar testing and side effects.

Clinicians were randomized to either use the decision aid cards (intervention) or discuss medications as usually done (control). Data was gathered from a self-administered written survey completed by patients immediately after the patient's visit. Compared with the control patients, those who used the cards found them helpful and felt they were more involved in making decisions about their diabetes medication. While both groups had near-perfect adherence to their medication use, the cards were effective in involving patients with type 2 diabetes in the decision making and are a promising tool for better patient outcomes.

The cards, originally created as a list of medication options, changed during their design. "The cards morphed from [originally] being a set of cards about medications with somewhat unpronounceable names into a set of cards about issues that might be important to people with type 2 diabetes," says Maggie Breslin, a designer in the SPARC Design Studio in the Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation. SPARC stands for See, Plan, Act, Refine, and Communicate and is the first design studio to be integrated into a medical practice setting, allowing the designers/researchers to work directly with patients in a care setting. She says the cards provided a much easier starting point for patients to better communicate with their care providers. You can view Breslin discussing the cards on YouTube.

The initial randomized trial of the Diabetes Medication Choice decision aid cards was inconclusive because both patient groups had near-perfect adherence to their medication use. However, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) recently awarded a grant to the team to further evaluate the efficacy of these cards in rural primary care practices in southeastern Minnesota.

Dr. Montori says, "We are going to see if these same tools can impact the health of patients with diabetes in rural communities in southeastern Minnesota & to see if these decision aids can in fact provide better patient-centered care for patients with diabetes."

Other trial co-authors are: Sandra Bryant; Laurie Pencille; Nilay Shah, Ph.D.; Steven Smith, M.D.; Robert Stroebel, M.D.; and Victor Yapuncich, M.D., all from Mayo Clinic; Gordon Guyatt, M.D., McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario; Lilisbeth Perestelo-Peres, Ph.D., Canary Islands Health Service and CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica, Tenerife, Spain; Barbara Yawn, M.D., Olmsted Medical Center, Rochester, Minn.; and the Department of Family and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

The study was funded by an American Diabetes Association grant.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rebecca J. Mullan; Victor M. Montori; Nilay D. Shah; Teresa J. H. Christianson; Sandra C. Bryant; Gordon H. Guyatt; Lilisbeth I. Perestelo-Perez; Robert J. Stroebel; Barbara P. Yawn; Victor Yapuncich; Maggie A. Breslin; Laurie Pencille; Steven A. Smith. The Diabetes Mellitus Medication Choice Decision Aid: A Randomized Trial. Archives of Internal Medicine, 2009; 169 (17): 1560 DOI: 10.1001/archinternmed.2009.293

Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Clinicians Develop New Decision Aid Tool To Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 October 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091015163559.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2009, October 15). Clinicians Develop New Decision Aid Tool To Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091015163559.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Clinicians Develop New Decision Aid Tool To Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091015163559.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

New Drug Could Reduce Cardiovascular Deaths

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) The new drug from Novartis could reduce cardiovascular deaths by 20 percent compared to other similar drugs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins