Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Surgeons offering new procedure for acid reflux, GERD

Date:
December 1, 2009
Source:
Boston University Medical Center
Summary:
Surgeons are now offering patients an incisionless alternative to laparoscopic and traditional surgery for treatment of acid reflux or GERD.

Boston Medical Center (BMC) surgeons are now offering patients an incisionless alternative to laparoscopic and traditional surgery for treatment of acid reflux or GERD.

Using the new procedure known as EsophyX TIF (Transoral Incisionless Fundaplication), surgeons can repair or reconstruct the valve between the esophagus and stomach, effectively stopping GERD. BMC is the only hospital in New England offering this new treatment.

GERD, also referred to as chronic heartburn, is reflux and regurgitation of the contents of the stomach into the esophagus that is frequent and severe enough to impact daily life and may even damage the esophagus. It is one of the most common diseases, with more than 60 million Americans experiencing symptoms at least once a month. Approximately 14 million Americans have GERD so frequent and severe that they experience symptoms every day.

Normally, after swallowing, a valve between the esophagus and stomach opens to allow food to pass into the stomach, then closes to prevent reflux of the food back into the esophagus. With GERD, this valve is weakened or absent, allowing the acidic digestive juices from the stomach to flow back (or reflux) into the esophagus. Using the EsophyX, BMC surgeons are able to pass surgical instruments together with an endoscope through a patient's mouth and tighten or repair the weakened valve without making any incisions into the skin.

"Compared to laparoscopic or traditional surgery, patients treated via the endoscope have required less anesthesia and experienced less complication rates, shorter hospital stays and faster recovery, reduced patient discomfort, and no need for incisions," said Miguel Burch, MD, Co-Director of Esophageal and Acid Reflux Disorders, Center for Digestive Disorders at BMC. "Patients are typically able to return home and to normal activities the day following the procedure," he added.

Complications associated with untreated GERD are well documented and can have a significant impact on quality of life and, in extreme cases, life expectancy. Esophagitis can quickly become a chronic condition, and if the damage is severe, esophageal ulcers can form. If left untreated, a potentially premalignant condition, Barrett's esophagus, can develop and in a small percentage of patients this can progress to esophageal cancer.

"While over-the-counter medications may alleviate the symptoms, by decreasing production of stomach acid, they don't solve the anatomical problem and reflux (without acid) can still continue causing injury but without symptoms to warn the patient," said Hiran Fernando, MD, a cardiothoracic surgeon and director of minimally invasive thoracic surgery at BMC who performs the procedure jointly with Burch. "For patients who are dissatisfied with pharmaceutical therapies and are concerned about the long-term effects of over-the counter medications, this procedure may be the answer," added Fernando.

According to the BMC surgeons, anatomical correction is key to long-term prevention of GERD and disease progression. Unfortunately, they say even laparoscopic surgical repair can be invasive and may be associated with side effects like gas bloat and difficulty swallowing. For this reason, less than one percent of GERD patients currently choose invasive surgical therapy to treat their condition.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Boston University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Boston University Medical Center. "Surgeons offering new procedure for acid reflux, GERD." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091026103846.htm>.
Boston University Medical Center. (2009, December 1). Surgeons offering new procedure for acid reflux, GERD. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091026103846.htm
Boston University Medical Center. "Surgeons offering new procedure for acid reflux, GERD." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/10/091026103846.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

Reuters - US Online Video (July 31, 2014) The Republican-led House of Representatives votes to sue President Obama, accusing him of overstepping his executive authority in making changes to the Affordable Care Act. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Newsy (July 31, 2014) Citing 81 previous studies, new research out of London suggests the benefits of smoking e-cigarettes instead of regular ones outweighs the risks. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins