Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

First effective medical therapy for rare stomach disorder

Date:
November 26, 2009
Source:
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Summary:
A drug used to treat colorectal cancer also can reverse a rare stomach disorder and should be considered first-line therapy for the disease, researchers report. The targeted cancer drug cetuximab, brand name Erbitux, relieved symptoms of severe Ménétrier's disease in seven patients who completed a one-month course of treatment. Four of them showed near-complete remission, the researchers report.

A drug used to treat colorectal cancer also can reverse a rare stomach disorder and should be considered first-line therapy for the disease, researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center report this week.

Related Articles


Ménétrier's disease causes thickening of the stomach lining, severe abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, as well as anemia and swelling in the feet and ankles due to protein loss. Patients are at increased risk for gastric cancer. Previously, the only effective treatment was gastrectomy -- surgical removal of the stomach.

The targeted cancer drug cetuximab, brand name Erbitux, relieved symptoms of severe Ménétrier's disease in seven patients who completed a one-month course of treatment. Four of them showed near-complete remission, the Vanderbilt researchers report in the Nov. 25 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

"We have identified the first effective medical therapy for this disorder," said Robert Coffey, M.D., Ingram Professor of Cancer Research and the paper's senior author.

Erbitux is a monoclonal antibody that blocks the binding of transforming growth factor-alpha, or TGF-alpha, a signaling protein, to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Patients with Ménétrier's disease have abnormally high levels of TGF-alpha.

In studies dating back 20 years, Coffey and his colleagues found that TGF-alpha causes proliferation of the stomach lining and stimulates mucous production while suppressing acid secretion. Transgenic mice that over-express TGF-alpha in the stomach exhibit all of the hallmarks of Ménétrier's disease.

The current study involved nine patients who were considering gastrectomy. Two patients dropped out of the study, but the rest experienced significant relief of symptoms within hours or days after beginning treatment. All seven continued taking the drug after the monthlong study ended.

Of the four patients who experienced near-complete remission of the disease, one of them, and the other three patients in the study, later underwent gastrectomy. Two patients are no longer taking the drug, and one of them has a normal stomach and remains symptom-free two years later, Coffey said.

The paper's first author is Haley Fiske, M.D., MPH, assistant professor in the Division of Gastroenterology.

Other co-authors: Jarred Tanksley, Ki Taek Nam, Ph.D., James Goldenring, M.D., Ph.D., Robbert Slebos, Ph.D., Daniel Liebler, Ph.D., Amir Abtahi, Bonnie La Fleur, Ph.D., Gregory Ayers, Christopher Lind, M.D., and Mary Washington, M.D., Ph.D.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Vanderbilt University Medical Center. "First effective medical therapy for rare stomach disorder." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 November 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091125145821.htm>.
Vanderbilt University Medical Center. (2009, November 26). First effective medical therapy for rare stomach disorder. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 6, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091125145821.htm
Vanderbilt University Medical Center. "First effective medical therapy for rare stomach disorder." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091125145821.htm (accessed March 6, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, March 6, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Bupa Eyes India Healthcare Opportunities

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) — Bupa is hoping to expand in India&apos;s fast-growing health insurance market, once a rule change on foreign investment is implemented. The British private healthcare group&apos;s CEO tells Grace Pascoe why it&apos;s so keen on the new opportunity. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Liberia Releases Last Ebola Patient, But Threat Remains

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) — Liberia&apos;s last Ebola patient has been released, and the country hasn&apos;t recorded a new case in a week. However, fears of another outbreak still exist. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Doctor in Your Pocket Is Getting Smarter

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 5, 2015) — Mobile apps are turning smartphones into a personal doctors, with users able to measure heart rate, blood pressure and even blood sugar. But will it change our behaviour? Ivor Bennett reports from the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
AbbVie Inks $21B Deal To Buy Cancer Drugmaker Pharmacyclics

AbbVie Inks $21B Deal To Buy Cancer Drugmaker Pharmacyclics

Newsy (Mar. 5, 2015) — AbbVie announced Wednesday it will buy cancer drugmaker Pharmacyclics in a $21 billion deal. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins