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Mystery solved: Scientists now know how smallpox kills

Date:
December 23, 2009
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
Researchers have solved a fundamental mystery about smallpox that has puzzled scientists long after the natural disease was eradicated by vaccination: they know how it kills us. Scientists can now describe how the virus cripples immune systems by attacking molecules made by our bodies to block viral replication.

A team of researchers working in a high containment laboratory at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, GA, have solved a fundamental mystery about smallpox that has puzzled scientists long after the natural disease was eradicated by vaccination.: they know how it kills us. In a new research report appearing online in The FASEB Journal, researchers describe how the virus cripples immune systems by attacking molecules made by our bodies to block viral replication.

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This discovery fills a major gap in the scientific understanding of pox diseases and lays the foundation for the development of antiviral treatments, should smallpox or related viruses re-emerge through accident, viral evolution, or terrorist action.

"These studies demonstrate the production of an interferon binding protein by variola virus and monkeypox virus, and point at this viral anti-interferon protein as a target to develop new therapeutics and protect people from smallpox and related viruses," said Antonio Alcami, Ph.D., a collaborator on the study from Madrid, Spain. "A better understanding of how variola virus, one of the most virulent viruses known to humans, evades host defenses will help up to understand the molecular mechanisms that cause disease in other viral infections."

In a high containment laboratory at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, scientists produced the recombinant proteins from the variola virus and a similar virus that affects monkeys, causing monkeypox. The researchers then showed that cells infected with variola and monkeypox produced a protein that blocks a wide range of human interferons, which are molecules produced by our immune systems meant to stop viral replication.

"The re-emergence of pox viruses has potentially devastating consequences for people worldwide, as increasing numbers of people lack immunity to smallpox," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "Understanding exactly how pox viruses disrupt our immune systems can help us develop defenses against natural and terror-borne pox viruses."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. del Mar Fernandez de Marco et al. The highly virulent variola and monkeypox viruses express secreted inhibitors of type I interferon. The FASEB Journal, 2009; DOI: 10.1096/fj.09-144733

Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Mystery solved: Scientists now know how smallpox kills." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091222105217.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2009, December 23). Mystery solved: Scientists now know how smallpox kills. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091222105217.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Mystery solved: Scientists now know how smallpox kills." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091222105217.htm (accessed October 24, 2014).

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