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Growing evidence suggests progesterone should be considered a treatment option for traumatic brain injuries

Date:
December 25, 2009
Source:
American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society
Summary:
Researchers recommend that progesterone, a naturally occurring hormone found in both males and females that can protect damaged cells in the central and peripheral nervous systems, be considered a viable treatment option for traumatic brain injuries.

Researchers at Emory University in Atlanta, GA, recommend that progesterone (PROG), a naturally occurring hormone found in both males and females that can protect damaged cells in the central and peripheral nervous systems, be considered a viable treatment option for traumatic brain injuries, according to a clinical perspective.

"Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an important clinical problem in the United States and around the world," said Donald G. Stein, PhD, lead author of the paper. "TBI has received more attention recently because of its high incidence among combat casualties in Iraq and Afghanistan. Current Department of Defense statistics indicated that as many as 30 percent of wounded soldiers seen at Walter Reed Army Hospital have suffered a TBI, a finding that has stimulated government interest in developing a safe and effective treatment for this complex disorder," said Stein.

"Growing evidence indicates that post-injury administration of PROG in a variety of brain damage models can have beneficial effects, leading to substantial and sustained improvements in brain functionality. PROG given to both males and females can cross the blood-brain barrier and reduce edema (swelling) levels after TBI; in different models of cerebral ischemia (restriction of blood supply), significantly reduce the area of necrotic cell death and improve behavioral outcomes; and protect neurons distal to the injury that would normally die," said Stein.

PROG was recently tested in two phase 2 clinical trials for traumatic brain injury and will begin a phase 3 NIH sponsored trial soon.

"Given its relatively high safety profile, its ease of administration, its low cost and ready availability, PROG should be considered a viable treatment option -- especially because, in brain injury, so little else is currently available," said Stein.

This study appears in the January issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. "Growing evidence suggests progesterone should be considered a treatment option for traumatic brain injuries." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091222121759.htm>.
American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. (2009, December 25). Growing evidence suggests progesterone should be considered a treatment option for traumatic brain injuries. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091222121759.htm
American College of Radiology / American Roentgen Ray Society. "Growing evidence suggests progesterone should be considered a treatment option for traumatic brain injuries." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091222121759.htm (accessed July 25, 2014).

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