Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Nitric oxide-releasing wrap for donor organs and cloth for therapeutic socks

Date:
January 8, 2010
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists are reporting development of a first-of-its-kind cloth that releases nitric oxide gas -- an advance toward making therapeutic socks for people with diabetes and a wrap to help preserve organs harvested for transplantation.

Porous materials termed zeolites, incorporated into this cloth, point the way to therapeutic bandages and wraps that can deliver healing nitric oxide.
Credit: American Chemical Society

Scientists in Texas are reporting development of a first-of-its-kind cloth that releases nitric oxide gas -- an advance toward making therapeutic socks for people with diabetes and a wrap to help preserve organs harvested for transplantation. The study is in ACS' Chemistry of Materials.

Kenneth Balkus and Harvey Liu note in the new study that nitric oxide (NO) helps increase blood flow and regulates a range of other body functions. Scientists have tried for years to find practical ways to store and deliver NO for use in medicine. However, they have had difficulty finding a suitable material that allows controlled delivery of NO. Recent studies suggested that zeolites could work. These porous materials soak up and store large amounts of gases like NO.

The scientists describe development of a new bandage composed of nitric oxide-absorbing zeolites embedded in a special water-repellant polymer. In experiments with laboratory rats, the bandage slowly released nitric oxide and increased blood flow. "The bandage could be used to wrap a donor organ ensuring intimate contact and direct delivery of nitric oxide," the report states. "Additionally, these interwoven fabrics could also find applications in smart textiles such as NO-releasing socks for diabetic patients, who have been shown to produce less nitric oxide than healthy patients."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Liu et al. Novel Delivery System for the Bioregulatory Agent Nitric Oxide. Chemistry of Materials, 2009; 21 (21): 5032 DOI: 10.1021/cm901358z

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Nitric oxide-releasing wrap for donor organs and cloth for therapeutic socks." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 January 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100106193314.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2010, January 8). Nitric oxide-releasing wrap for donor organs and cloth for therapeutic socks. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100106193314.htm
American Chemical Society. "Nitric oxide-releasing wrap for donor organs and cloth for therapeutic socks." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100106193314.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Small Reactors Could Be Future of Nuclear Energy

Small Reactors Could Be Future of Nuclear Energy

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) After the Fukushima nuclear disaster, the industry fell under intense scrutiny. Now, small underground nuclear power plants are being considered as the possible future of the nuclear energy. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Horseless Carriage Introduced at NY Auto Show

Horseless Carriage Introduced at NY Auto Show

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) An electric car that proponents hope will replace horse-drawn carriages in New York City has also been revealed at the auto show. (Apr. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Honda's New ASIMO Robot, More Human-Like Than Ever

Honda's New ASIMO Robot, More Human-Like Than Ever

AFP (Apr. 17, 2014) It walks and runs, even up and down stairs. It can open a bottle and serve a drink, and politely tries to shake hands with a stranger. Meet the latest ASIMO, Honda's humanoid robot. Duration: 00:54 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
German Researchers Crack Samsung's Fingerprint Scanner

German Researchers Crack Samsung's Fingerprint Scanner

Newsy (Apr. 16, 2014) German researchers have used a fake fingerprint made from glue to bypass the fingerprint security system on Samsung's new Galaxy S5 smartphone. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins