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Next-generation biorefinery is aim of new European project

Date:
March 10, 2010
Source:
SINTEF
Summary:
Europe's four-year EuroBioRef project aims to cover the whole biomass conversion chain from raw materials to commercial products.

The EU's four-year EuroBioRef project, which was launched on March 1, aims to cover the whole biomass conversion chain from raw materials to commercial products.

The EU's 7th Framework Programme is financing the €23 million project, in which 28 partners from 14 countries are participating.

From oil to timber

Expertise in developing and implementing processes related to biorefining is of decisive importance for our ability to build up a sustainable bioeconomy in Europe.

EuroBioRef covers the whole biomass conversion chain from raw materials to the production of commercial fine chemicals, and the project will develop a new concept that will include complex raw materials, processes and products. One specific aim is to overcome the fragmentation of today's biomass industry.

Catalysts

SINTEF Materials and Chemistry's Department of Process Chemistry is running one of this major project's work-packages, in which our scientists will develop new catalysts for converting sugars into other chemicals.

"As oil and gas resources gradually diminish, we will have to consider using biomass instead as a raw material instead of oil to produce chemicals such as aviation fuel additives," says Morten Frψseth, SINTEF's coordinator for the project.

"Our aim is to convert sugars into more useful chemicals for the market. The biomass can simply be "reconstructed" to make chemicals that can be used in other industrial processes."

Improved efficiency

The objective of EuroBioRef is to improved cost-efficiency by 30 percent through better reaction and separation processes, reduced capital investment requirements and better factory plant. The project also expects to achieve a 30 percent reduction in energy consumption, as well as waste-free production.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by SINTEF. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

SINTEF. "Next-generation biorefinery is aim of new European project." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100310083842.htm>.
SINTEF. (2010, March 10). Next-generation biorefinery is aim of new European project. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100310083842.htm
SINTEF. "Next-generation biorefinery is aim of new European project." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100310083842.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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