Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Weekend hospital admissions are higher risk for patients with acute kidney injury

Date:
April 15, 2010
Source:
American Society of Nephrology
Summary:
Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) who are admitted to the hospital on a weekend are more likely to die than those admitted on a weekday, according to a new study. This disparity was most evident in smaller hospitals. The findings indicate that researchers should further investigate the availability and timing of care to patients hospitalized with AKI.

Patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) who are admitted to the hospital on a weekend are more likely to die than those admitted on a weekday, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN). This disparity was most evident in smaller hospitals. The findings indicate that researchers should further investigate the availability and timing of care to patients hospitalized with AKI.

Studies have shown that for a variety of acute illnesses, patients admitted to the hospital on a weekend are more likely to die than those admitted on a weekday. To investigate whether this is true for patients with AKI, Matthew James, MD (University of Calgary, in Alberta, Canada), Glenn Chertow, MD (Stanford University School of Medicine), and colleagues examined information from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a large database of admissions to acute care, nonfederal hospitals in the United States. They identified 963,730 admissions with a diagnosis of AKI between 2003 and 2006. Of these, 214,962 admissions (22%) designated AKI as the primary reason for admission (45,203 on a weekend and 169,759 on a weekday).

The investigators found that during hospitalization, 14,686 (6.8%) patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of AKI died. Patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of AKI on a weekend had a 22% increased risk of dying by day three of admission, and a 7% increase of dying during the duration of their hospital stay, compared with patients admitted on a weekday. In small hospitals, the risk was even greater. There, compared with patients admitted on a weekday, a patient's risk of dying after admission on a weekend for AKI was 34% higher after day three of admission and 17% higher over the duration of their hospital stay. The investigators also found an increased risk of death following a weekend admission among patients who were admitted for other conditions but later diagnosed with AKI during their hospital stay.

"There are many reasons why this research is important," said Chertow. "Optimizing patient safety and nephrology resource utilization are among the two most relevant," he noted.

While the underlying reasons for the observed increased deaths among AKI patients admitted on a weekend are unknown and require further investigation, other studies have described delays in assessment, diagnosis, and management of other acute medical conditions on weekends.

Study co-authors include Ron Wald, MDCM, Chaim M. Bell, MD, PhD, FRCPC (University of Toronto, in Ontario, Canada); Marcello Tonelli, MD (University of Alberta, in Alberta, Canada), Brenda R. Hemmelgarn, MD, PhD, FRCPC (University of Calgary, in Alberta, Canada); and Sushrut S. Waikar, MD (Harvard Medical School).

In reviewing the results of Dr. James' and Dr. Chertow's study in an accompanying editorial, William McClellan, MD (Emory University) stated that the study was well-designed and that its results should encourage investigators to identify "potentially modifiable risk factors that contribute to mortality differences" so that efforts can be made to reduce AKI patients' risk of dying when admitted to the hospital on a weekend. He noted that current guidelines recommend that a patient who is admitted to the hospital for AKI should receive a timely consultation with a kidney specialist, a determination of the cause and severity of his or her condition, appropriate medications and nutritional support, and various other attributes of care. According to Dr. McClellan, it may be informative to determine how differences in these and other aspects of care might contribute to weekday-to-weekend and hospital-to-hospital variability in mortality of patients with AKI.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Nephrology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. W. M. McClellan. Variations in Mortality among Hospitalizations for Acute Kidney Injury. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2010; DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2010030300

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology. "Weekend hospital admissions are higher risk for patients with acute kidney injury." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 April 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100415171402.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology. (2010, April 15). Weekend hospital admissions are higher risk for patients with acute kidney injury. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100415171402.htm
American Society of Nephrology. "Weekend hospital admissions are higher risk for patients with acute kidney injury." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100415171402.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Microneedle Patch Promises Painless Pricks

Microneedle Patch Promises Painless Pricks

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 18, 2014) Researchers at The National University of Singapore have invented a new microneedle patch that could offer a faster and less painful delivery of drugs such as insulin and painkillers. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Nurse Nina Pham Arrives in Maryland

Raw: Nurse Nina Pham Arrives in Maryland

AP (Oct. 17, 2014) The first nurse to be diagnosed with Ebola at a Dallas hospital walked down the stairs of an executive jet into an ambulance at an airport in Frederick, Maryland, on Thursday. Pham will be treated at the National Institutes of Health. (Oct. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Raw: Cruise Ship Returns to US Over Ebola Fears

Raw: Cruise Ship Returns to US Over Ebola Fears

AP (Oct. 17, 2014) A Caribbean cruise ship carrying a Dallas health care worker who is being monitored for signs of the Ebola virus is heading back to Texas, US, after being refused permission to dock in Cozumel, Mexico. (Oct. 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Spanish Govt: Four Suspected Ebola Cases in Spain Test Negative

Spanish Govt: Four Suspected Ebola Cases in Spain Test Negative

AFP (Oct. 17, 2014) All four suspected Ebola cases admitted to hospitals in Spain on Thursday have tested negative for the deadly virus in a first round of tests, the government said Friday. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins