Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Alternative strategies to reduce maternal mortality in India

Date:
April 20, 2010
Source:
Public Library of Science
Summary:
A new study finds that better family planning, provision of safe abortion, and improved intrapartum and emergency obstetrical care could reduce maternal mortality in India by 75 percent in less than a decade.

A study by Sue J. Goldie and colleagues from the Harvard School of Public Health published this week in PLoS Medicine finds that better family planning, provision of safe abortion, and improved intrapartum and emergency obstetrical care could reduce maternal mortality in India by 75% in less than a decade.

Most maternal deaths in developing countries are caused by severe bleeding after childbirth, infections soon after delivery, blood pressure disorders during pregnancy, and obstructed (difficult) labor. The authors capture the complexity of multiple factors that impact on maternal mortality using a computer-based model that simulates the progress of women through pregnancy and childbirth in rural and urban India, and estimates clinical outcomes (pregnancies, complications, live births, or deaths), costs, and cost-effectiveness (a metric that indicates the 'value' of an intervention, and is expressed as 'cost per year of life saved').

The authors find that in just 5 years, more than 150,000 maternal deaths could be prevented by reducing unmet contraceptive needs. They further find that an integrated approach (improved access to family planning and safe abortion, coupled with stepwise improvements in skilled birth attendants, improved care before and after birth, reduced home births, and improved emergency obstetrical care) could ultimately prevent more than 3 out of 4 maternal deaths. For those women who deliver at home, integrated strategies include better recognition of when referral is needed and improved access to transport. All of these interventions either save money or are cost-effective.

In 2005, a woman's lifetime risk of maternal death in India was 1 in 70.These findings therefore have significant public health relevance. Moreover, these data also indicate that the fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG 5) (that the global maternal mortality rate would be reduced to a quarter of its 1990 level by 2015), may be within reach in India.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Public Library of Science. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Goldie et al. Alternative Strategies to Reduce Maternal Mortality in India: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. PLoS Medicine, 2010; 7 (4): e1000264 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1000264

Cite This Page:

Public Library of Science. "Alternative strategies to reduce maternal mortality in India." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 April 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100420174115.htm>.
Public Library of Science. (2010, April 20). Alternative strategies to reduce maternal mortality in India. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 14, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100420174115.htm
Public Library of Science. "Alternative strategies to reduce maternal mortality in India." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100420174115.htm (accessed September 14, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Newsy (Sep. 13, 2014) A U.K. survey found that journalists consumed the most amount of coffee, but that's only the tip of the coffee-related statistics iceberg. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Contagious Respiratory Illness Continues to Spread Across U.S.

Contagious Respiratory Illness Continues to Spread Across U.S.

Reuters - US Online Video (Sep. 12, 2014) Hundreds of children in several states have been stricken by a serious respiratory illness that is spreading across the U.S. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Batters Sierra Leone Economy Too

Ebola Batters Sierra Leone Economy Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 12, 2014) The World Health Organisation warns that local health workers in West Africa can't keep up with Ebola - and among those countries hardest hit by the outbreak, the economic damage is coming into focus, too. As David Pollard reports, Sierra Leone admits that growth in one of the poorest economies in the region is taking a beating. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Care Workers 'Chasing' Ebola Outbreak

Health Care Workers 'Chasing' Ebola Outbreak

Newsy (Sep. 12, 2014) The worst known Ebola outbreak is proving extremely difficult to contain. Hospitals are full, and victims of the virus are suffering in the streets. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins