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Brain-like computing on an organic molecular layer

Date:
April 26, 2010
Source:
Michigan Technological University
Summary:
One big advantage a brain's circuitry has always had over a computer's is its ability to evolve as it tackles complex problems. Now, scientists have created a tiny computing device with a brain-like "evolutionary circuit."

Magnetic resonance images of human brain during different functions appear on top. Similar evolving patterns have been generated on the molecular monolayer one after another (bottom). A snapshot of the evolving pattern for a particular brain function is captured using Scanning Tunneling Microscope at 0.68 V tip bias (scale bar is 6 nm). The input pattern to mimic particular brain function is distinct, and the dynamics of pattern evolution is also typical for a particular brain operation.
Credit: Anirban Bandyopadhyay

Information processing circuits in digital computers are static. In our brains, information processing circuits -- neurons -- evolve continuously to solve complex problems. Now, an international research team from Japan and Michigan Technological University has created a similar process of circuit evolution in an organic molecular layer that can solve complex problems. This is the first time a brain-like "evolutionary circuit" has been realized.

This computer is massively parallel: The world's fastest supercomputers can only process bits one at a time in each of their channels. Their circuit allows instantaneous changes of ~300 bits.

Their processor can produce solutions to problems for which algorithms on computers are unknown, like predictions of natural calamities and outbreaks of disease. To prove this unique feature, they have mimicked two natural phenomena in the molecular layer: heat diffusion and the evolution of cancer cells.

The monolayer has intelligence; it can solve many problems on the same grid.

Their molecular processor heals itself if there is a defect. This remarkable self-healing property comes from the self-organizing ability of the molecular monolayer. No existing man-made computer has this property, but our brain does: if a neuron dies, another neuron takes over its function.

The work is described in Nature Physics. It is coauthored by Ranjit Pati, of the Michigan Technological University Department of Physics. Lead author is Anirban Bandyopadhyay, National Institute for Materials Science, National Institute of Information and Communication Technology, Japan.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Michigan Technological University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Anirban Bandyopadhyay, Ranjit Pati, Satyajit Sahu, Ferdinand Peper & Daisuke Fujita. Massively parallel computing on an organic molecular layer. Nature Physics, 25 April 2010 DOI: 10.1038/nphys1636

Cite This Page:

Michigan Technological University. "Brain-like computing on an organic molecular layer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 April 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100425151146.htm>.
Michigan Technological University. (2010, April 26). Brain-like computing on an organic molecular layer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100425151146.htm
Michigan Technological University. "Brain-like computing on an organic molecular layer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100425151146.htm (accessed September 23, 2014).

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