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'Mouse grimace scale' to help identify pain in humans and animals

Date:
May 10, 2010
Source:
McGill University
Summary:
A new study by psychologists in Canada shows that mice, like humans, express pain through facial expressions. The researchers have discovered that when subjected to moderate pain stimuli, mice showed discomfort through facial expressions in the same way humans do.

A newly developed Mouse Grimace Scale could inform better treatments for humans and improve conditions for lab animals, psychology researchers say.
Credit: iStockphoto

A new study by researchers from McGill University and the University of British Columbia shows that mice, like humans, express pain through facial expressions. The research will not only be an important tool in helping scientists ensure that laboratory animals don't suffer unnecessarily, but could lead to new and better pain-relief drugs for humans.

McGill Psychology Prof. Jeffrey Mogil, UBC Psychology Prof. Kenneth Craig and their respective teams have discovered that when subjected to moderate pain stimuli, mice showed discomfort through facial expressions in the same way humans do. Their study, published online May 9 in the journal Nature Methods, also details the development of a Mouse Grimace Scale that could inform better treatments for humans and improve conditions for lab animals.

Because pain research relies heavily on rodent models, an accurate measurement of pain is paramount in understanding the most pervasive and important symptom of chronic pain, namely spontaneous pain, says Mogil.

"The Mouse Grimace Scale provides a measurement system that will both accelerate the development of new analgesics for humans, but also eliminate unnecessary suffering of laboratory mice in biomedical research," says Mogil. "There are also serious implications for the improvement of veterinary care more generally."

This is the first time researchers have successfully developed a scale to measure spontaneous responses in animals that resemble human responses to those same painful states.

Mogil, graduate student Dale Langford and colleagues in the Pain Genetics Lab at McGill analyzed images of mice before and during moderate pain stimuli -- for example, the injection of dilute inflammatory substances, as are commonly used around the world for testing pain sensitivity in rodents. The level of pain studied could be comparable, researchers said, to a headache or the pain associated with an inflamed and swollen finger easily treated by common analgesics like Aspirin or Tylenol.

Mogil then sent the images to Craig's lab at UBC, where facial pain coding experts used them to develop the scale. Craig's team proposed that five facial features be scored: orbital tightening (eye closing), nose and cheek bulges and ear and whisker positions according to the severity of the stimulus. Craig's laboratory is a leader in studying facial expression as the standard for assessing pain in human infants and others with verbal communication limitations. This work is an example of successful "bedside-to-bench" translation, where a technique known to be relevant in our species is adapted for use in laboratory experiments.

Continuing experiments in the lab will investigate whether the scale works equally well in other species, whether analgesic drugs given to mice after surgical procedures work well at their commonly prescribed doses, and whether mice can respond to the facial pain cues of other mice.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by McGill University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Dale J Langford, Andrea L Bailey, Mona Lisa Chanda, Sarah E Clarke, Tanya E Drummond, Stephanie Echols, Sarah Glick, Joelle Ingrao, Tammy Klassen-Ross, Michael L LaCroix-Fralish, Lynn Matsumiya, Robert E Sorge, Susana G Sotocinal, John M Tabaka, David Wong, Arn M J M van den Maagdenberg, Michel D Ferrari, Kenneth D Craig & Jeffrey S Mogil. Coding of facial expressions of pain in the laboratory mouse. Nature Methods, 2010; DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.1455

Cite This Page:

McGill University. "'Mouse grimace scale' to help identify pain in humans and animals." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100509144655.htm>.
McGill University. (2010, May 10). 'Mouse grimace scale' to help identify pain in humans and animals. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100509144655.htm
McGill University. "'Mouse grimace scale' to help identify pain in humans and animals." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100509144655.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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