Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Restless legs syndrome: French-Canadian families at higher risk

Date:
May 11, 2010
Source:
University of Montreal
Summary:
Restless legs syndrome, which causes an irresistible desire to move legs, appears to be a hereditary condition that's more prominent among French Canadian women and may be caused by a combination of genetic influences and environmental effects. According to a large-scale study, siblings of people affected by restless legs syndrome are three and a half times more likely to develop the disease.

Restless legs syndrome, which causes an irresistible desire to move legs, appears to be a hereditary condition that's more prominent among French Canadian women and may be caused by a combination of genetic influences and environmental effects. According to a large-scale study published in the Archives of Neurology, siblings of people affected by restless legs syndrome are three and a half times more likely to develop the disease.

Related Articles


The investigation, which builds on previous research that suggested the ailment is clustered in families, is the work of scientists from the University of Montreal, Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center, University of Montreal Hospital Research Center, Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, Montreal Heart Institute, Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University.

"Until now, there has been a lack of large-scale, systematic and clinical studies precisely measuring the degree of heritability of restless legs syndrome in families -- information that is critical if we are to advance genetic studies and discover the cause of this condition," says senior author Guy Rouleau, a professor at the University of Montreal Faculty of Medicine, director of the Sainte-Justine University Hospital Research Center and a scientist at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center.

The research team studied 671 individuals diagnosed with restless legs syndrome in Quebec, Canada: 192 who were assessed at the Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal sleep center and 479 affected family members who responded to diagnostic interviews. In cases where one family member was diagnosed with restless legs syndrome, the condition appeared in 77 percent in other family members who participated in the study. By age 60, siblings of an individual with the condition were about 3.6 times more likely to have restless legs syndrome compared to people without an affected sibling. Offspring of parents with the condition had 1.8 times the risk of developing restless legs syndrome by the age of 40.

"Restless legs syndrome is prevalent in 10 to 15 percent of French-Canadians, yet the neurological disorder is often misdiagnosed. Restless legs syndrome is a chronic disorder with an average of 24 years of suffering, affects people of all ages and usually begins before the age of 30. Most family members who are diagnosed with the disease experience moderate symptoms of restless legs syndrome," says first author says Lan Xiong, a Université de Montréal researcher. "Our findings indicate that familial restless legs syndrome is more prominent among female relatives, particularly those who also have anemia or iron deficiency conditions, and who have multiple pregnancies."

The research team suggested that restless legs syndrome clusters in families due to genetic influences, environmental effects or the combination of both. "The cumulative total of family members affected by restless legs syndrome should be of interest to all concerned physicians, geneticists and epidemiologists," says Dr. Rouleau. "We also recommend that scientists and clinicians further examine how environmental risk factors, combined with genetic predisposition, may contribute to the occurrence of restless legs syndrome in families."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Montreal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lan Xiong; Jacques Montplaisir; Alex Desautels; Amina Barhdadi; Gustavo Turecki; Anastasia Levchenko; Pascale Thibodeau; Marie-Pierre Dube; Claudia Gaspar; Guy A. Rouleau. Family Study of Restless Legs Syndrome in Quebec, Canada: Clinical Characterization of 671 Familial Cases. Arch Neurol, 2010; 67 (5): 617-622 [link]

Cite This Page:

University of Montreal. "Restless legs syndrome: French-Canadian families at higher risk." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100510161302.htm>.
University of Montreal. (2010, May 11). Restless legs syndrome: French-Canadian families at higher risk. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100510161302.htm
University of Montreal. "Restless legs syndrome: French-Canadian families at higher risk." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100510161302.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) — It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) — More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) — In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) — The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins