Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Experts call for urgent action to tackle strong links between impotence and heart disease

Date:
May 19, 2010
Source:
Wiley-Blackwell
Summary:
International experts are calling for all men experiencing impotence to undergo thorough medical assessments, after an extensive review showed that a significant proportion of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) exhibit early signs of coronary artery disease. Men with ED will often develop coronary symptoms within two to three years of impotence and actually experience a cardiovascular event, such as a heart attack, within three to five years.

International experts are calling for all men experiencing impotence to undergo thorough medical assessments, after an extensive review showed that a significant proportion of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) exhibit early signs of coronary artery disease (CAD).

Related Articles


A paper published in the June issue of IJCP, the International Journal of Clinical Practice, shows that men with ED will often develop coronary symptoms within two to three years of impotence and actually experience a cardiovascular event, such as a heart attack, within three to five years.

The authors stress that it is vital that clinicians stabilise cardiovascular function and control any symptoms before even considering initiating any ED therapy.

Dr Graham Jackson, a London-based cardiologist and Chair of the Sexual Advice Association, teamed up with 11 experts from all over the UK, Italy, Greece and the USA to analyse the findings of more than a hundred studies on the links between ED and CAD.

They concluded that:

  • ED in otherwise healthy men and those with type 2 diabetes may be associated with early subclinical signs of CAD, including reduced blood flow and calcification of the arteries.
  • Men with ED generally exhibit more severe CAD and dysfunction in the left ventricle of the heart than those without ED and the severity of the ED may also be correlated with the severity of the CAD.
  • In around two-thirds of men, CAD is preceded by ED. The association in younger men aged between 40 and 69 is much clearer than in men over 70.
  • ED is associated with an increase in all-cause mortality, primarily through its associated with CAD.

A number of studies have sought to quantify the increased risk.

  • One study found that men aged between 30 and 39 with moderate to severe ED have a 14 per cent higher risk of developing CAD within ten years than men without CAD (4.9 per cent and 4.3 per cent respectively). This figure rose to 27 per cent in men aged 60 to 69 (21.1 per cent and 16.6 per cent respectively).
  • Other studies suggest that the increased risk can range from 30 to 60 per cent, compared with a 40 per cent increase for a man with a family history of heart attacks and a 10 per cent increase for a 20mg/dl rise in serum cholesterol concentration.

The authors suggest that the link between the two conditions could be due to atherosclerosis, a systemic condition where plaque builds up inside the arteries, leading to restricted blood flow.

"It has been suggested that because the arteries supplying the penis are smaller than those supplying the heart, they will be affected by reduced blood flow -- a major cause of ED -- before the symptoms of CAD develop" explains Dr Jackson.

"This theory may underpin the findings that men with ED seldom report overt symptoms of CAD, but those with CAD often report pre-existing ED symptoms."

The paper goes on to discuss prevention strategies and how patients should be assessed, tested, managed and followed up. Special guidance is also provided on dealing with patients with diabetes.

"The evidence supporting the relationship between ED and cardiovascular disease has continued to increase over recent years and yet recognition of the association remains limited among healthcare professionals and the general public" concludes Dr Jackson.

"Clinicians who specialise in managing ED support the evidence that ED is a critical predictor of cardiovascular disease and that men with ED therefore face an increased risk."

The authors, who have extensive experience of cardiovascular and sexual medicine, hope that the evidence and consensus detailed in their IJCP paper will encourage greater international interest and research on the association between ED and CAD.

"Recognising the relationship between ED and CAD will improve and save lives" says Dr Jackson. "That is why wider awareness of the links is essential."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley-Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. G. Jackson, N. Boon, I. Eardley, M. Kirby, J. Dean, G. Hackett, P. Montorsi, F. Montorsi, C. Vlachopoulos, R. Kloner, I. Sharlip, M. Miner. Erectile dysfunction and coronary artery disease prediction: evidence-based guidance and consensus. International Journal of Clinical Practice, 2010; 64 (7): 848 DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-1241.2010.02410.x

Cite This Page:

Wiley-Blackwell. "Experts call for urgent action to tackle strong links between impotence and heart disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 19 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100519112613.htm>.
Wiley-Blackwell. (2010, May 19). Experts call for urgent action to tackle strong links between impotence and heart disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100519112613.htm
Wiley-Blackwell. "Experts call for urgent action to tackle strong links between impotence and heart disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100519112613.htm (accessed April 1, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3-D Printed 'robohand'

7-Year-Old Girl Gets 3-D Printed 'robohand'

AP (Mar. 31, 2015) — Although she never had much interest in prosthetic limbs before, Faith Lennox couldn&apos;t wait to slip on her new robohand. The 7-year-old, who lost part of her left arm when she was a baby, grabbed it as soon as it came off a 3-D printer. (March 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Solitair Device Aims to Takes Guesswork out of Sun Safety

Solitair Device Aims to Takes Guesswork out of Sun Safety

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 31, 2015) — The Solitair device aims to take the confusion out of how much sunlight we should expose our skin to. Small enough to be worn as a tie or hair clip, it monitors the user&apos;s sun exposure by taking into account their skin pigment, location and schedule. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Soda, Salt and Sugar: The Next Generation of Taxes

Soda, Salt and Sugar: The Next Generation of Taxes

Washington Post (Mar. 30, 2015) — Denisa Livingston, a health advocate for the Dinι Community Advocacy Alliance, and the Post&apos;s Abby Phillip discuss efforts around the country to make unhealthy food choices hurt your wallet as much as your waistline. Video provided by Washington Post
Powered by NewsLook.com
UnitedHealth Buys Catamaran

UnitedHealth Buys Catamaran

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 30, 2015) — The $12.8 billion merger will combine the U.S.&apos; third and fourth largest pharmacy benefit managers. Analysts say smaller PBMs could also merge. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins