Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Promising treatment for aggressive lymphoma identified in new study

Date:
May 27, 2010
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
New research illustrates that some patients with transformed lymphoma showed "remarkable" response to lenalidomide, an oral drug with few side effects.

New research illustrates that some patients with transformed lymphoma showed "remarkable" response to lenalidomide, an oral drug with few side effects.

The international study, involving 24 medical centers in the United States and Europe, will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting June 4-8, 2010, in Chicago.

Forty-five percent of patients with transformed lymphoma treated with lenalidomide responded positively to this immunomodulatory medication, which kills lymphoma cells by activating the body's natural killer cells and by interrupting cancer cell signaling that leads to cell death. Of those patients, 21 percent showed complete remission, some for more than a year.

Transformed lymphoma is an aggressive form of blood cancer. With current therapies, patients have a median survival rate of 1.7 years. In comparison, patients with indolent or slow-growing lymphoma can live 10 to 20 years with the disease. However, over the course of a decade, about 30 percent of those with indolent lymphoma develop transformed lymphoma.

"The study results show a remarkable response rate for transformed lymphoma patients who have a very poor prognosis," says Craig Reeder, M.D., Mayo Clinic hematologist and principal investigator for the phase II study at Mayo Clinic's Arizona campus. Phase II studies typically include no more than 300 patients and are designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific therapy.

The study included 217 patients with aggressive lymphoma. Of those, 33 had transformed lymphoma and were treated with lenalidomide. These patients ranged in age from 42 to 84. More than half had stage IV disease, where the lymphoma has spread to multiple sites or organs. All patients had been treated with chemotherapy and some with stem cell transplant to curtail the cancer. The median number of previous treatments was four and ranged up to 12.

Patients took lenalidomide pills (25 mg) daily for 21 days. For seven days, no medication was given. The medication continued until signs of cancer progression. Overall, 45 percent of patients responded positively to the therapy, but results varied by the particular type of transformed lymphoma.

For transformed follicular lymphoma, the most common form of the illness, 13 of the 23 patients (57 percent) in this subgroup responded positively to lenalidomide. Ten patients with other types of transformed lymphoma did not respond. They included transformed chronic lymphocytic leukemia, small lymphocytic lymphoma and others.

Dr. Reeder notes that while the number of patients treated with lenalidomide was small, the results are promising because of the response rate, the length of the response, and the simplicity of treatment. In patients who responded, the positive effect of lenalidomide was seen for a median of nearly 13 months. Compared to chemotherapy drugs, lenalidomide is easy to administer and is well tolerated. "Its appeal is that it's not toxic to the patient," he says. Side effects were considered mild and included low white blood cell counts.

Lenalidomide is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat multiple myeloma and certain types of myelodysplastic syndrome. Mayo Clinic researchers and others have been studying its potential as a lymphoma treatment for about two years. Further studies are needed to confirm its role in treating patients with transformed lymphoma.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Promising treatment for aggressive lymphoma identified in new study." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 May 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100526151531.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2010, May 27). Promising treatment for aggressive lymphoma identified in new study. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100526151531.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Promising treatment for aggressive lymphoma identified in new study." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100526151531.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

AFP (Aug. 19, 2014) Residents of Sierra Leone's capital voice their fears as the Ebola virus sweeps through west Africa. Duration: 00:56 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
101-Year-Old Working Man Has All The Advice You Need

101-Year-Old Working Man Has All The Advice You Need

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Herman Goldman has worked at the same lighting store for almost 75 years. Find out his secrets to a happy, productive life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patient Apparently Improving, Outbreak Is Not

American Ebola Patient Apparently Improving, Outbreak Is Not

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Nancy Writebol, an American missionary who contracted Ebola, is apparently getting better, according to her husband. The outbreak, however, is not. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins