Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Fewer meth-related emergency visits reported following Oregon 'anti-meth' legislation

Date:
June 7, 2010
Source:
Oregon Health & Science University
Summary:
The number of methamphetamine-related emergency room visits decreased significantly in the year following the implementation of Oregon's law prohibiting the sale of over-the-counter decongestant containing pseudoephedrine, according to Oregon Health & Science Emergency Department physician-researchers.

The number of methamphetamine-related emergency room visits decreased significantly in the year following the implementation of Oregon's law prohibiting the sale of over-the-counter decongestant containing pseudoephedrine, according to Oregon Health & Science Emergency Department physician-researchers.

Their findings were presented June 5, at the annual meeting of the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine in Phoenix, Ariz.

"This is one of the first studies to suggest that limitation of supply of an illicit substance may be effective at decreasing its use as well as its associated medical problems," said Rob Hendrickson, M.D., principal investigator, medical toxicologist and an associate professor of emergency medicine in the OHSU School of Medicine. "Our research suggests that the state legislation limiting the supply of methamphetamine was associated with a decrease in methamphetamine use and, in particular, a decrease in medical problems related to methamphetamine."

Methamphetamine is an illegal drug of abuse typically produced through the chemical conversion of over-the-counter pseudoephedrine. In July 2006 Oregon became the first state to make over-the-counter medicines containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine and phenylpropanolamine -- key ingredients used in the illegal manufacture of meth -- prescription-only drugs.

Following the law's implementation, Hendrickson and colleagues in the OHSU Emergency Department (ED) sought to determine whether the new legislation was an effective deterrent of methamphetamine use or methamphetamine-related disorders.

To conduct their research, the research team queried OHSU ED physicians to determine whether each individual patient visit to the ED was methamphetamine-related. The ED physicians were required to enter a response in the patient's electronic medical record prior to discharge. A database was kept and 38,417 patients were recorded. Of those patient encounters, 721 were deemed meth-related.

Following the one-year study, Feb. 5, 2006, to Feb. 5, 2007, the researchers found a 35 percent decrease in visits to the ED that were related to methamphetamine and a 29 percent decrease in patients who admitted to methamphetamine use. They also report that in the months prior to the law's enactment, they had an average of 18 methamphetamine-related Emergency Department visits per week in the OHSU ED. Post-legislation, that number fell to an average 11.3 per week.

"We are hoping to further explore if the decreases that we see in methamphetamine-related visits continue in the future and if further limitations of supply or other interventions affect ED visits," Hendrickson said.

Co-investigators on the study are Robert Cloutier, M.D., assistant professor of emergency medicine, and K. John McConnell, Ph.D., associate professor of emergency medicine, both of the OHSU School of Medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Oregon Health & Science University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Oregon Health & Science University. "Fewer meth-related emergency visits reported following Oregon 'anti-meth' legislation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100607101654.htm>.
Oregon Health & Science University. (2010, June 7). Fewer meth-related emergency visits reported following Oregon 'anti-meth' legislation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100607101654.htm
Oregon Health & Science University. "Fewer meth-related emergency visits reported following Oregon 'anti-meth' legislation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100607101654.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Do Video Games Trump Brain Training For Cognitive Boosts?

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) More and more studies are showing positive benefits to playing video games, but the jury is still out on brain training programs. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Your Spouse's Personality May Influence Your Earnings

Your Spouse's Personality May Influence Your Earnings

Newsy (Sep. 26, 2014) Research from Washington University suggest people with conscientious spouses have greater career success. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can A Blood Test Predict Psychosis Risk?

Can A Blood Test Predict Psychosis Risk?

Newsy (Sep. 26, 2014) Researchers say certain markers in the blood can predict risk of psychosis later in the life. The test can aid in early treatment for the condition. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Harpist Soothes Gorillas, Orangutans With Music

Harpist Soothes Gorillas, Orangutans With Music

AP (Sep. 25, 2014) Teri Tacheny, a harpist, has a loyal following of fans who appreciate her soothing music. Every month, gorillas, orangutans and monkeys amble down to hear her play at the Como Park Zoo in Minnesota. (Sept. 25) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins