Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Novel paclitaxel formulation encouraging for treating advanced lung cancer

Date:
June 15, 2010
Source:
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer
Summary:
Researchers report the results of a study aimed at determining the optimal dose of the chemotherapy drug nab-paclitaxel with carboplatin as a first-line therapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

The June edition of the Journal of Thoracic Oncology features a study aimed at determining the optimal dose of the chemotherapy drug nab-paclitaxel with carboplatin as a first-line therapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results will provide researchers with a data needed to guide a phase 3 trial.

Related Articles


The most commonly used combination treatment for patients with NSCLC is carboplatin plus solvent-based paclitaxel. However, this current treatment has major safety and efficacy concerns, such as severe toxicities, nerve damage. As lung cancer is the leading cause of lung cancer death worldwide, there is a critical need for safe chemotherapy treatments to curb this disease.

In this multi-center study, researchers sought to determine the optimal dose of a chemotherapy treatment using a novel paclitaxel formulation, nanoparticle albuminbound (nab-), which can be administered safely at higher doses than the solvent-based paclitaxel and has performed well when treating breast cancer patients. One hundred seventy-five previously untreated patients were enrolled in the study and received treatment with nab-paclitaxel either on a weekly or every-three-week basis. Dosing levels were also investigated.

Overall results showed response rate was greater in weekly doses than in every-three-week doses. Median progression-free survival was similar between both schedules and ranged from 4.8 to 6.9 months in the every-three-week cohorts and 5.6 to 6.4 months in the weekly cohorts. Overall survival was also similar in both groups and ranged from 8.3 to 14.6 months in the every-three-week cohort and 11.3 to 15.0 in the weekly cohort. Most favorable of all the cohorts was the group receiving 100 mg/m2 weekly nab-paclitaxel. This group achieved a 48 percent response rate with 6.2 and 11.3 months of progression-free survival and overall survival, respectively.

In addition to improved anti-tumor activity, nab-paclitaxel administered weekly was associated with less serious adverse events than when administered every three weeks, with significant reductions of nerve damage and muscle and joint pain. More specifically, it was found that a 100 mg/m2 weekly nab-paclitaxel produced less serious adverse events than other doses.

Researchers concluded that nab-paclitaxel plus carboplatin is an effective therapy for advanced NSCLC and recommend a phase 3, randomized, multi-center study comparison 100 mg/m2 weekly nab-paclitaxel plus carboplatin to solvent-based paclitaxel plus carboplatin.

"Given the high cumulative dose delivered and the excellent safety and efficacy profile of the patients who received 100 mg/m2 weekly nab-paclitaxel plus carboplatin, we believe this to be the optimal dosing and schedule for phase 3 comparison in patients with advanced NSCLC," confirms lead investigator Mark A. Socinski, MD of the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mark A. Socinski, Georgiy M. Manikhas, Daniil L. Stroyakovsky, Anatoly N. Makhson, Sergey V. Cheporov, Sergei V. Orlov, Petr K. Yablonsky, Paul H. Bhar, Jose Iglesias. A Dose Finding Study of Weekly and Every-3-Week nab-Paclitaxel Followed by Carboplatin as First-Line Therapy in Patients with Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer. Journal of Thoracic Oncology, 2010; 5 (6): 852 DOI: 10.1097/JTO.0b013e3181d5e39e

Cite This Page:

International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. "Novel paclitaxel formulation encouraging for treating advanced lung cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100615112227.htm>.
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. (2010, June 15). Novel paclitaxel formulation encouraging for treating advanced lung cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100615112227.htm
International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. "Novel paclitaxel formulation encouraging for treating advanced lung cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100615112227.htm (accessed December 22, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, December 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A team of scientists led by Danish chemist Jorn Christensen says they have isolated two chemical compounds within an existing antipsychotic medication that could be used to help a range of failing antibiotics work against killer bacterial infections, such as Tuberculosis. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Newsy (Dec. 21, 2014) Carnegie Mellon researchers found frequent hugs can help people avoid stress-related illnesses. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins