Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Alzheimer's imaging study identifies changes in brain's white matter

Date:
June 29, 2010
Source:
University of Kentucky
Summary:
Researchers have used MRI to detect deterioration of white matter tracts in the brains of older adults at high risk for Alzheimer's disease. Data suggest that changes in white matter connections may be among the earliest brain changes in Alzheimer's disease, which may prove important for early detection by noninvasive imaging.

MRI methods reveal white matter tracts showing decreased integrity in normal seniors at high risk for Alzheimer's disease. The white matter tracts are shown in green. Those tracts affected (shown in red) connect gray matter structures involved in memory formation such as the medial temporal and inferior frontal lobes.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Kentucky

Scientists at the University of Kentucky's College of Medicine have identified changes in the brains of normal individuals at high risk for Alzheimer's disease that could prove important for early detection of the disease.

Related Articles


The research, led by Brian Gold, associate professor of anatomy and neurobiology, focused on the brain's white matter, which forms the majority of deep parts of the brain and consists primarily of myelinated nerve cell processes, or axons. These myelinated axons serve to connect the brain's gray matter regions, which contain nerve cell bodies.

"The brain's white matter can be thought of as a set of telephone wires which enable communication between gray matter 'thinking regions'," Gold said.

Previous studies have demonstrated decline in both gray and white matter tissue types in individuals with Alzheimer's. In the present study, the authors sought to determine which of these changes are present in normal seniors at high risk for Alzheimer's disease, a likely target group for emerging interventions.

The high-risk group consisted of individuals whom have both genetic and family risk factors for Alzheimer's disease but do not yet show cognitive changes. The low-risk control group consisted of individuals who had neither risk factor but were similar to the high-risk group in terms of age, education level and cognitive functioning.

The study used several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to assess the integrity of gray matter and white matter brain tissue in the high and low risk groups. In particular, a recently developed form of MRI called diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to assess the integrity of the brain's white matter. This technique allows for assessment of the microstructural integrity of axons and their surrounding myelin.

Results indicated that the two groups did not differ in the tissue volumes of several gray matter regions know to contribute to memory function. However, the high-risk group showed decreased integrity in white matter tracts that inter-connect gray matter regions involved in memory function. Both the axonal and myelin integrity of these white matter tracts were reduced.

These data suggest that changes in white matter connections may be among the earliest brain changes in Alzheimer's disease, which may prove important for early detection by non-invasive imaging. In addition, the findings may have implications for the development of new preventative treatment interventions in Alzheimer's disease, which could attempt to protect axon and myelin integrity in seniors at risk for this neurological disorder.

The findings were published in an article in the journal NeuroImage. This research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Kentucky. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Brian T. Gold, David K. Powell, Anders H. Andersen, Charles D. Smith. Alterations in multiple measures of white matter integrity in normal women at high risk for Alzheimer's disease. NeuroImage, 2010; DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.05.036

Cite This Page:

University of Kentucky. "Alzheimer's imaging study identifies changes in brain's white matter." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100628112119.htm>.
University of Kentucky. (2010, June 29). Alzheimer's imaging study identifies changes in brain's white matter. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100628112119.htm
University of Kentucky. "Alzheimer's imaging study identifies changes in brain's white matter." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100628112119.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) A double-amputee makes history by becoming the first person to wear and operate two prosthetic arms using only his mind. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Prenatal Exposure To Pollution Might Increase Autism Risk

Newsy (Dec. 18, 2014) Harvard researchers found children whose mothers were exposed to high pollution levels in the third trimester were twice as likely to develop autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Yoga Could Be As Beneficial For The Heart As Walking, Biking

Yoga Could Be As Beneficial For The Heart As Walking, Biking

Newsy (Dec. 17, 2014) Yoga can help your weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and heart just as much as biking and walking does, a new study suggests. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins