Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Light shed on triglyceride metabolism

Date:
August 8, 2010
Source:
Cell Press
Summary:
New findings are offering new leads as to why some people might suffer from high levels of triglycerides. High triglycerides are a risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. They can also lead to inflammation of the pancreas, the researchers said.

New findings reported in the July issue of Cell Metabolism, are offering new leads as to why some people might suffer from high levels of triglycerides. High triglycerides are a risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. They can also lead to inflammation of the pancreas, the researchers said.

Related Articles


The team led by Loren Fong and Stephen Young of the University of California, Los Angeles, has identified the component responsible for bringing a key triglyceride-processing enzyme (called lipoprotein lipase or LPL for short) into the capillaries, where it does its work.

"LPL is required for normal metabolism of triglycerides in blood," Fong said. "If there is no LPL, triglycerides accumulate."

Scientists have known for decades that the LPL enzyme is produced in fat and muscle before it makes its way into blood vessels. What they didn't know until now was how it got there.

It seems that a protein known as GPIHBP1 is the key. Mice lacking that protein end up with LPL built up outside of their muscle and fat tissue instead of where it belongs in capillaries. They show that GPIHBP1 normally sits on the surface of capillary cells, where it actively transports LPL.

The new findings offer an explanation for what had been a surprising finding; Gpihbp1-deficient mice develop severe hypertriglyceridemia, even when they eat a normal diet of mouse chow. Very recently, other researchers have also shown that some people with elevated triglyceride levels carry mutations in their GPIHBP1 gene.

Fong and Young say they don't yet know exactly how GPIHBP1 does its job of transporting LPL into capillaries. It's likely that other as-yet unknown players are involved. Their team also suspects that GPIHBP1 may influence triglyceride metabolism in other ways, aside from its transport function.

There is also much left to learn about how the process is regulated in response to diet or other factors. For instance, "if you eat a fatty meal with more lipids, does this transport go faster?" Fong asked.

The findings may help sort out the causes of hypertriglyceridemia, which in many instances remain unclear.

"In humans, mechanisms for severe cases of hypercholesterolemia have come into focus, but the same cannot be said for many cases of severe hypertriglyceridemia," the researchers wrote. Many patients with very high triglyceride levels don't have mutations in any of the genes with known links to the condition and some have no obvious abnormalities in LPL levels either.

"It seems possible that defective transport of LPL into the capillaries could underlie at least some cases of hypertriglyceridemia in humans," they said.

The researchers include Brandon S.J. Davies, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; Anne P. Beigneux, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; Richard H. Barnes II, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; Yiping Tu, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; Peter Gin, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; Michael M. Weinstein, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; Chika Nobumori, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; Rakel Nyren, Umea University, Umea, Sweden; Ira Goldberg, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY; Gunilla Olivecrona, Umea University, Umea, Sweden; Andre´ Bensadoun, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY; Stephen G. Young, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; and Loren G. Fong, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cell Press. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Brandon S.J. Davies, Anne P. Beigneux, Richard H. Barnes, Yiping Tu, Peter Gin, Michael M. Weinstein, Chika Nobumori, Rakel Nyrén, Ira Goldberg, Gunilla Olivecrona, André Bensadoun, Stephen G. Young, Loren G. Fong. GPIHBP1 Is Responsible for the Entry of Lipoprotein Lipase into Capillaries. Cell Metabolism, July 7, 2010 DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2010.04.016

Cite This Page:

Cell Press. "Light shed on triglyceride metabolism." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 8 August 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100707112427.htm>.
Cell Press. (2010, August 8). Light shed on triglyceride metabolism. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100707112427.htm
Cell Press. "Light shed on triglyceride metabolism." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100707112427.htm (accessed March 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

AFP (Mar. 28, 2015) — Sierra Leone imposed a three-day nationwide lockdown Friday for the second time in six months in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) — A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) — The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) — In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins