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Toward making 'extended blood group typing' more widely available

Date:
July 16, 2010
Source:
American Chemical Society
Summary:
Scientists are reporting an advance toward enabling more blood banks to adopt so-called "extended blood group typing," which increases transfusion safety by better matching donors and recipients.
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Scientists are reporting an advance toward enabling more blood banks to adopt so-called "extended blood group typing," which increases transfusion safety by better matching donors and recipients. Their report on a new, automated genetic method for determining a broader range of blood types appears in ACS' Analytical Chemistry.

Christophe Marquette and colleagues explain that most blood banks still use a century-old blood approach to blood typing. It identifies blood group antigens on red blood cells -- proteins that must match in donor and recipient to avoid potentially serious transfusion reactions. Most blood currently is typed for only a few of the 29 known human blood groups, even though some rare blood groups can affect the outcome of a transfusion. Commercial technology does exist for extended typing with DNA tests. However, it is expensive, difficult to use, and suited more for research labs than high-volume blood centers, they state. Wide adoption of extended blood group typing, they note, requires a test that can handle the high volume of blood processed each year -- 14 million donations in the United States, for instance, and 20 million in Europe.

The study describes evaluation of the new more affordable method, called the HiFi Blood 96, which types blood with DNA testing in a high-speed automated procedure. Tests on 293 human blood samples demonstrated the performance and reliability of the new method. The report compares HiFi Blood 96 to existing commercial tests, and discusses improvements that are underway.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by American Chemical Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Le Goff et al. Robust, High-Throughput Solution for Blood Group Genotyping. Analytical Chemistry, 2010; 82 (14): 6185 DOI: 10.1021/ac101008d

Cite This Page:

American Chemical Society. "Toward making 'extended blood group typing' more widely available." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100714121739.htm>.
American Chemical Society. (2010, July 16). Toward making 'extended blood group typing' more widely available. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100714121739.htm
American Chemical Society. "Toward making 'extended blood group typing' more widely available." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100714121739.htm (accessed July 3, 2015).

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