Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Morning test helps doctors save kidneys

Date:
July 25, 2010
Source:
American Society of Nephrology
Summary:
A morning urine test is superior to all other tests for detecting declining kidney performance in patients with diabetic kidney disease, according to a new study. The results suggest that clinicians should monitor kidney function by measuring the albumin:creatinine ratio from a first morning urine sample.

A morning urine test is superior to all other tests for detecting declining kidney performance in patients with diabetic kidney disease, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society Nephrology (JASN). The results suggest that clinicians should monitor kidney function by measuring the albumin:creatinine ratio from a first morning urine sample.

Related Articles


Individuals with kidney dysfunction often excrete excess protein in the urine, a condition called proteinuria. Screening for proteinuria may help identify people at risk for kidney disease progression, but uncertainties persist as to how urine should be collected and which specific urinary proteins should be measured. Because the different screening methods available may confuse clinicians, it may hamper the use of proteinuria to manage patients with kidney disease.

Hiddo Lambers Heerspink, PharmD, PhD (University Medical Center Groningen, in the Netherlands) and his colleagues assessed and compared the ability of various proteinuria measures, including proteinuria versus albuminuria and 24-hours versus early morning sampling, to predict worsening kidney problems. Albuminuria, a large component of proteinuria, is more specific than total proteinuria and is defined as an excess amount of albumin in the urine. Four measures were compared:

  • urinary protein excretion from a 24-hour urine collection,
  • urinary albumin excretion from a 24-hour urine collection,
  • urinary albumin concentration from a first morning urine sample, and
  • albumin:creatinine ratio from a first morning urine sample (the amount of albumin in the urine sample normalized by the amount of creatinine).

The investigators conducted their analysis in 701 patients with type 2 diabetes and kidney disease who were participating in the Reduction in Endpoints in Non Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus with the Angiotensin-II Antagonist Losartan (RENAAL) trial. They defined worsening kidney function as the development of end-stage renal disease or a doubling of blood levels of creatinine (a breakdown product of muscle creatine). Kidney dysfunction diminishes the ability to filter creatinine, resulting in a rise in blood creatinine levels.

Dr. Lambers Heerspink and his team found that measuring the albumin:creatinine ratio in a first morning urine sample was the superior method to predict kidney problems in patients with type 2 diabetes and kidney disease. "From a clinical point of view, these results are very important, because they imply that collection of first morning voids, which is clearly more convenient than collecting a 24-hour urine, can be used for assessment of proteinuria," Dr. Lambers Heerspink said. The authors noted that standardizing proteinuria measures will improve methods for detecting and monitoring kidney disease.

The RENAAL study was sponsored by Merck & Co., Inc. Study co-authors include Ron Gansevoort, MD, PhD, Dick de Zeeuw, MD, PhD (University Medical Center Groningen); Barry Brenner, MD (Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard School of Medicine); Mark Cooper, MD PhD (Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, in Melbourne, Australia); Hans Henrik Parving MD, PhD (University Hospital of Copenhagen, in Denmark); and Shahnaz Shahinfar, MD (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia).

In an accompanying editorial, Bryan Kestenbaum, MD and Ian de Boer, MD (University of Washington, Seattle) stated that "given data from this study and the considerable patient effort required for a 24-hour urine collection, we agree with the authors that the first morning albumin:creatinine ratio is in general the logical choice for quantifying proteinuria in clinical practice."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Nephrology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Heerspink et al. Comparison of Different Measures of Urinary Protein Excretion for Prediction of Renal Events. Journal of the American Society Nephrology, 2010; DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2010010063

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology. "Morning test helps doctors save kidneys." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100715172004.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology. (2010, July 25). Morning test helps doctors save kidneys. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100715172004.htm
American Society of Nephrology. "Morning test helps doctors save kidneys." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100715172004.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins