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Artificial cells communicate and cooperate like biological cells, ants

Date:
July 20, 2010
Source:
University of Pittsburgh
Summary:
Researchers have designed "biologically inspired" artificial cells capable of self-organizing into independent groups that can communicate and cooperate, behaving like complex natural organisms.

The above image shows the cells in “snake” formation as competing signaling capsules (shown in red) pull respective lines of target cells in opposite directions.
Credit: University of Pittsburgh

Inspired by the social interactions of ants and slime molds, University of Pittsburgh engineers have designed artificial cells capable of self-organizing into independent groups that can communicate and cooperate.

Recently reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the research is a significant step toward producing synthetic cells that behave like natural organisms and could perform important, microscale functions in fields ranging from the chemical industry to medicine.

The team presents in the PNAS paper computational models that provide a blueprint for developing artificial cells -- or microcapsules -- that can communicate, move independently, and transport "cargo" such as chemicals needed for reactions. Most importantly, the "biologically inspired" devices function entirely through simple physical and chemical processes, behaving like complex natural organisms but without the complicated internal biochemistry, said corresponding author Anna Balazs, Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering in Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering.

The Pitt group's microcapsules interact by secreting nanoparticles in a way similar to that used by biological cells signal to communicate and assemble into groups. And with a nod to ants, the cells leave chemical trails as they travel, prompting fellow microcapsules to follow. Balazs worked with lead author German Kolmakov and Victor Yashin, both postdoctoral researchers in Pitt's Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, who produced the cell models; and with Pitt professor of electrical and computer engineering Steven Levitan, who devised the ant-like trailing ability.

The researchers write that communication hinges on the interaction between microcapsules exchanging two different types of nanoparticles. The "signaling" cell secretes nanoparticles known as agonists that prompt the second "target" microcapsule to emit nanoparticles known as antagonists.

In one video of the interaction, as the signaling cell emits the agonist nanoparticles, the target cell responds with antagonists that stop the first cell from secreting. Once the signaling cell goes dormant, the target cell likewise stops releasing antagonists -- which makes the signaling cell start up again. The microcapsules get locked into a cycle that equates to an intercellular conversation, a dialogue humans could control by adjusting the capsules' permeability and the quantity of nanoparticles they contain.

Locomotion results as the released nanoparticles alter the surface underneath the microcapsules. The cell's polymer-based walls begin to push on the fluid surrounding the capsule and the fluid pushes back even harder, moving the capsule. At the same time, the nanoparticles from the signaling cell pull it toward the target cells. Groups of capsules begin to form as the signaling cell rolls along, picking up target cells. In practical use, Balazs said, the signaling cell could transport target cells loaded with cargo; the team's next step is to control the order in which target cells are collected and dropped off.

The researchers adjusted the particle output of the signaling cell to create various cell formations. One video clip shows the trailing "ants," wherein the particle secretions of one microcapsule group are delayed until another group passes by and activates it. The newly awakened cluster then follows the chemical residue left behind by the lead group.

A second film depicts a "dragon" formation comprising two cooperating signaling cells (shown as red) leading a large group of targets. Similar to these are "snakes" made up of competing signaling capsules pulling respective lines of target cells.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Pittsburgh. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. German V. Kolmakov, Victor V. Yashin, Steven P. Levitan, Anna C. Balazs. Designing communicating colonies of biomimetic microcapsules. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2010; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1001950107

Cite This Page:

University of Pittsburgh. "Artificial cells communicate and cooperate like biological cells, ants." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100719142452.htm>.
University of Pittsburgh. (2010, July 20). Artificial cells communicate and cooperate like biological cells, ants. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100719142452.htm
University of Pittsburgh. "Artificial cells communicate and cooperate like biological cells, ants." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100719142452.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

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