Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Radical new computer memory? Emergent resistance network suggests mechanism for colossal magnetoresistance

Date:
July 27, 2010
Source:
RIKEN
Summary:
Research has revealed new clues on the microscopic processes by which resistance in certain materials is dramatically altered by the presence of magnetic fields. The discovery provides fundamental insights toward the development of radically new memory and switching devices.

Magnetic-field dependence of the resistivity of Nd0.5Sr0.5MnO3 thin film and its microwave impedance microscope images. a : Magnetic-field dependence of the resistivity at 10 K. b,c : Images of microwave impedance microscope taken in the magnetic field of 2.4 and 9.0 tesla. The red region indicates insulating state and the yellow region indicates metallic state.
Credit: Image courtesy of RIKEN

Research by scientists at Stanford University and RIKEN has revealed new clues on the microscopic processes by which resistance in certain materials is dramatically altered by the presence of magnetic fields. Reported in Science, the discovery provides fundamental insights toward the development of radically new memory and switching devices.

Colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), a phenomenon in which enormous variations in resistance are produced by small magnetic field changes, has attracted attention as a means to develop low-power, more compact alternatives to conventional circuits. Unlike semiconductors such as silicon, electrons in the manganites and other transition metal oxides in which CMR occurs interact strongly with each other, held in place by a lattice that constrains their movement. CMR is triggered when a strong magnetic field induces such materials to tip from a charge-ordered insulating phase into a ferromagnetic metallic phase, drastically altering the material's properties.

An earlier technique developed by the team was successful in producing manganite films only a few dozen nanometers thick capable of undergoing this transition from insulating to metallic phase. To explore the mechanisms underlying this transition, the researchers adapted a microwave impedance microscope to withstand cryogenic temperatures and extreme magnetic fields. Using this microscope, they discovered that under a powerful 9 tesla magnetic field, filamentary metallic domains emerge in the manganite films, forming an interconnected network aligned along the axes of the film substrate.

The first ever evidence of a microscopic mechanism for CMR, the discovery of this network greatly enhances our understanding of microscopic phase transitions in thin film manganites. It also marks a major advance in the race toward new memory and switching devices, whose impact promises to revolutionize computing technology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by RIKEN. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. K. Lai, M. Nakamura, W. Kundhikanjana, M. Kawasaki, Y. Tokura, M. A. Kelly, Z.-X. Shen. Mesoscopic Percolating Resistance Network in a Strained Manganite Thin Film. Science, 2010; 329 (5988): 190 DOI: 10.1126/science.1189925

Cite This Page:

RIKEN. "Radical new computer memory? Emergent resistance network suggests mechanism for colossal magnetoresistance." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 July 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100727065645.htm>.
RIKEN. (2010, July 27). Radical new computer memory? Emergent resistance network suggests mechanism for colossal magnetoresistance. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100727065645.htm
RIKEN. "Radical new computer memory? Emergent resistance network suggests mechanism for colossal magnetoresistance." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/07/100727065645.htm (accessed July 28, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Monday, July 28, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming

The Carbon Trap: US Exports Global Warming

AP (July 28, 2014) AP Investigation: As the Obama administration weans the country off dirty fuels, energy companies are ramping-up overseas coal exports at a heavy price. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shipping Crates Get New 'lease' On Life

Shipping Crates Get New 'lease' On Life

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 25, 2014) Shipping containers have been piling up as America imports more than it exports. Some university students in Washington D.C. are set to get a first-hand lesson in recycling. Their housing is being built using refashioned shipping containers. Lily Jamali reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Europe's Highest Train Turns 80 in French Pyrenees

Europe's Highest Train Turns 80 in French Pyrenees

AFP (July 25, 2014) Europe's highest train, the little train of Artouste in the French Pyrenees, celebrates its 80th birthday. Duration: 01:05 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
TSA Administrator on Politics and Flight Bans

TSA Administrator on Politics and Flight Bans

AP (July 24, 2014) TSA administrator, John Pistole's took part in the Aspen Security Forum 2014, where he answered questions on lifting of the ban on flights into Israel's Tel Aviv airport and whether politics played a role in lifting the ban. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins