Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

You say, 'bio-math,' I say, 'math-bio': Crossing science education divide

Date:
September 2, 2010
Source:
American Society for Cell Biology
Summary:
The old joke is a joke no more. In new research, the adage that biology is for science students who don't do math is laid to rest forever. "Bio-math" or "math-bio" is the future for students of both disciplines, say the contributors of seven essays and 17 research articles on new ways to integrate mathematical thinking into biology education and vice versa.

The old joke is a joke no more. In a special September issue of the ASCB's online journal, CBE—Life Sciences Education ( CBE-LSE), the adage that biology is for science students who don't do math is laid to rest forever. "Bio-math" or "math-bio" is in the future for students of both disciplines, say the contributors of seven essays and 17 research articles on new ways to integrate mathematical thinking into biology education and introduce biological problems into math learning.

"The national scientific and academic community has issued repeated clarion calls for revising college biology curricula such that mathematical and computational preparation for future life scientists reflects the tools and practices of science," explains Pat Marsteller of Emory University. Marsteller acted as special issue co-editor with John Jungck of Beloit College. "This issue celebrates progress on incorporating quantitative reasoning into biology courses and integrating biological exemplars into mathematics courses," she said.

"BIO2010," a 2003 report by the National Research Council, pointed out that genomics, bioinformatics, and quantitative biology of all kinds were already driving cutting-edge research in basic and clinical bioscience. The report concluded that 21st century science students at all levels had to be prepared for a brave new interdisciplinary world. In response to BIO2010, the contributors to this special issue of CBE-LSE offer "how to" advice and "best methods" analysis on bridging the traditionally wide gap between math and biology skills, especially for undergraduates. In "From Biology to Mathematical Models and Back," Kendrick Shaw and colleagues report on teaching modeling to biology students and biology to math and engineering students. Irene M. Evans and Yolanda V. Tra describe using DNA microarray analysis as a two-way bridge between math and biology classes. Other articles explore the biology–math interface in the context of student diversity and team-based student research and through imaginative approaches such as "beanbag biology."

Perhaps the most striking visual example of integrated bio-math education comes from Andrej Šorgo of the University of Maribor in Slovenia. To demonstrate the power of fractal geometry in modeling complex biological structures, Šorgo and his students formed a giant human fractal by lying prone on the floor of a university rotunda and extending their arms and legs into a multi-pointed, concentric fractal star.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society for Cell Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society for Cell Biology. "You say, 'bio-math,' I say, 'math-bio': Crossing science education divide." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100902131734.htm>.
American Society for Cell Biology. (2010, September 2). You say, 'bio-math,' I say, 'math-bio': Crossing science education divide. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100902131734.htm
American Society for Cell Biology. "You say, 'bio-math,' I say, 'math-bio': Crossing science education divide." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100902131734.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

FBI Finishes $1 Billion Facial Recognition System

FBI Finishes $1 Billion Facial Recognition System

Newsy (Sep. 15, 2014) The FBI announced it plans to make its Next Generation Identification System available to law enforcement, but some privacy advocates are worried. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
A+ for Apple iPhone Pre-Sales

A+ for Apple iPhone Pre-Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 15, 2014) Apple says it received a record 4 million first-day pre-orders for its new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, pushing delivery dates into October. Bobbi Rebell reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Microsoft to Buy 'Minecraft' Maker for $2.5B

Microsoft to Buy 'Minecraft' Maker for $2.5B

AP (Sep. 15, 2014) Microsoft will acquire the maker of the long-running hit game Minecraft for $2.5 billion as the company continues to invest in its Xbox gaming platform and looks to grab attention on mobile phones. (Sept. 15) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Manufacturer Prints 3-D Car In Record Time

Manufacturer Prints 3-D Car In Record Time

Newsy (Sep. 15, 2014) Automobile manufacturer Local Motors created a drivable electric car using a 3-D printer. Printing the body only took 44 hours. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins