Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Yeast holds clues to Parkinson's disease

Date:
September 21, 2010
Source:
Society for General Microbiology
Summary:
Yeast could be a powerful ally in the discovery of new therapeutic drugs to treat Parkinson's disease. Researchers in Portugal are slowly uncovering the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease by studying the associated human protein in yeast cells.

Yeast could be a powerful ally in the discovery of new therapeutic drugs to treat Parkinson's disease says a scientist presenting his work at the Society for General Microbiology's autumn meeting in Nottingham.

Related Articles


Dr Tiago Fleming Outeiro from the Instituto de Medicina Molecular in Lisbon, Portugal describes how his group is slowly uncovering the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease by studying the associated human protein in yeast cells.

Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder without any known cure that affects around 6 million people worldwide. The symptoms, which include rigidity, difficulty in initiating movements and resting tremors, are all related to the specific death of dopamine-producing neurons in the brain. These neurons characteristically contain protein deposits, known as Lewy bodies. A small protein called alpha-synclein is the main component of these deposits.

Dr Outeiro explains how baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is helping researchers learn how alpha-synuclein might lead to Parkinson's disease. "Yeast is a very simple but powerful model in which to study how alpha-synuclein actually works as, remarkably, many of the biochemical pathways involved are similar between yeast and humans," he said. "There is still a lot we don't know about the function of this protein, but we do know that even small increases in the level of alpha-synuclein in cells lead to cell death."

Dr Outeiro, along with colleagues in the USA, screened a library of 115,000 small compounds to try and identify those that are able to block the toxic effects of alpha-synuclein. Several of these molecules have proved effective in preventing Parkinson's disease in worms and blocking alpha-synuclein toxicity in rat neurons. If developed further, they could form the basis of future drugs to treat Parkinson's disease in humans.

New treatments for neurodegenerative diseases are urgently needed. "With the ageing of the human population the number of people affected by Parkinson's disease will continue to increase. This means the disease will become an even greater problem for modern societies due to the tremendous socio-economic costs associated," Dr Outeiro said. "It's therefore imperative that treatments for such neurodegenerative diseases are developed. Our studies in yeast have enabled us make a step towards this."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for General Microbiology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for General Microbiology. "Yeast holds clues to Parkinson's disease." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100908191132.htm>.
Society for General Microbiology. (2010, September 21). Yeast holds clues to Parkinson's disease. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100908191132.htm
Society for General Microbiology. "Yeast holds clues to Parkinson's disease." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100908191132.htm (accessed January 26, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, January 26, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

Ebola Mistakes Should Serve a Lesson Says WHO

AFP (Jan. 25, 2015) The World Health Organization&apos;s chief on Sunday admitted the UN agency had been caught napping on Ebola, saying it should serve a lesson to avoid similar mistakes in future. Duration: 00:55 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Disneyland Measles Outbreak Spreads To 5 States

Newsy (Jan. 24, 2015) Much of the Disneyland measles outbreak is being blamed on the anti-vaccination movement. The CDC encourages just about everyone get immunized. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

Growing Measles Outbreak Worries Calif. Parents

AP (Jan. 23, 2015) Public health officials are rushing to contain a measles outbreak that has sickened 70 people across 6 states and Mexico. The AP&apos;s Raquel Maria Dillon has more. (Jan. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) A Boston start-up is developing a wristband they say will help users break bad habits by jolting them with an electric shock. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins