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Mimicking nature, water-based 'artificial leaf' produces electricity

Date:
September 24, 2010
Source:
North Carolina State University
Summary:
Scientists have shown that water-gel-based solar devices -- "artificial leaves" -- can act like solar cells to produce electricity. The findings prove the concept for making solar cells that more closely mimic nature. They also have the potential to be less expensive and more environmentally friendly than the current standard-bearer: silicon-based solar cells.

Just as real leaves do, water-gel-based solar devices can act like solar cells to produce electricity, new research shows.
Credit: Dr. Orlin Velev, North Carolina State University

A team led by a North Carolina State University researcher has shown that water-gel-based solar devices -- "artificial leaves" -- can act like solar cells to produce electricity. The findings prove the concept for making solar cells that more closely mimic nature. They also have the potential to be less expensive and more environmentally friendly than the current standard-bearer: silicon-based solar cells.

The bendable devices are composed of water-based gel infused with light-sensitive molecules -- the researchers used plant chlorophyll in one of the experiments -- coupled with electrodes coated by carbon materials, such as carbon nanotubes or graphite. The light-sensitive molecules get "excited" by the sun's rays to produce electricity, similar to plant molecules that get excited to synthesize sugars in order to grow, says NC State's Dr. Orlin Velev, Invista Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and the lead author of a paper published online in the Journal of Materials Chemistry describing this new generation of solar cells.

Velev says that the research team hopes to "learn how to mimic the materials by which nature harnesses solar energy." Although synthetic light-sensitive molecules can be used, Velev says naturally derived products -- like chlorophyll -- are also easily integrated in these devices because of their water-gel matrix.

Now that they've proven the concept, Velev says the researchers will work to fine-tune the water-based photovoltaic devices, making them even more like real leaves.

"The next step is to mimic the self-regenerating mechanisms found in plants," Velev says. "The other challenge is to change the water-based gel and light-sensitive molecules to improve the efficiency of the solar cells."

Velev even imagines a future where roofs could be covered with soft sheets of similar electricity-generating artificial-leaf solar cells.

"We do not want to overpromise at this stage, as the devices are still of relatively low efficiency and there is a long way to go before this can become a practical technology," Velev says. "However, we believe that the concept of biologically inspired 'soft' devices for generating electricity may in the future provide an alternative for the present-day solid-state technologies."

Researchers from the Air Force Research Laboratory and Chung-Ang University in Korea co-authored the study. The study was funded by the Air Force Research Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy. The work is part of NC State's universitywide nanotechnology program, Nano@NC State.

NC State's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering is part of the university's College of Engineering.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by North Carolina State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Hyung-Jun Koo, Suk Tai Chang, Joseph M. Slocik, Rajesh R. Naik, Orlin D. Velev. Aqueous soft matter based photovoltaic devices. Journal of Materials Chemistry, 2011; DOI: 10.1039/c0jm01820a

Cite This Page:

North Carolina State University. "Mimicking nature, water-based 'artificial leaf' produces electricity." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100924121218.htm>.
North Carolina State University. (2010, September 24). Mimicking nature, water-based 'artificial leaf' produces electricity. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100924121218.htm
North Carolina State University. "Mimicking nature, water-based 'artificial leaf' produces electricity." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100924121218.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

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