Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New sound recording device helps doctors study link between cough and reflux

Date:
October 14, 2010
Source:
American Gastroenterological Association
Summary:
Coughing episodes are closely related to gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in patients who experience chronic cough, irrespective of other diagnoses, according to a new study. Gastroesophageal reflux occurs when the acid contents of the stomach back up, or reflux, into the esophagus. This typically produces heartburn, a burning sensation below the sternum where your ribs come together.

Coughing episodes are closely related to gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in patients who experience chronic cough, irrespective of other diagnoses, according to a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute. Gastroesophageal reflux occurs when the acid contents of the stomach back up, or reflux, into the esophagus. This typically produces heartburn, a burning sensation below the sternum where your ribs come together.

Related Articles


"This is the first study to investigate the temporal relationship between cough and reflux events using a validated sound recording device to register the precise timing and occurrence of actual cough sounds," said Jaclyn A. Smith, PhD, MRCP, of the University of Manchester and lead author of the study. "By using this novel approach, which helps prevent under-reporting of coughing occurrences, we are better able to identify how cough events and reflux events are linked to one another."

Cough -- regardless of cause and duration -- is the most common symptom for which patients seek medical attention. Chronic cough (i.e., persists for more than eight weeks) is estimated to affect 11 percent to 20 percent of the population, has a high socioeconomic impact and results in significant reduction in quality of life. Proposed causes of chronic cough include gastroesophageal reflux, rhino-sinusitis and asthma, although recent studies suggest that targeting such mechanisms with drugs only results in approximately half of patients reporting symptom relief.

The majority of studies assessing reflux-cough associations have used a data logger and/or symptom diary to record coughs, which has been shown to significantly under-report the occurrence of coughing. However, in this study, novel ambulatory cough sound recordings, which allowed patients to continue with their normal routines, together with simultaneous impedance/pH monitoring (i.e., preferable technology for establishing symptom-reflux association) over 24 hours, was carried out in 71 patients with chronic cough, aged 51 to 64 years. The recordings were performed using a custom-built validated recording device and microphone; cough was manually counted using software with an audiovisual display. In addition, all patients underwent cough reflex sensitivity testing to citric acid, and 66 patients underwent gastroscopy.

The study researchers found that 70 percent of patients exhibited temporal associations, with 48 percent having a positive symptom association probability for cough preceded by reflux; 56 percent had a positive symptom association probability for reflux preceded by cough; and 32 percent had both.

The presence of cough preceding reflux points to the possible existence of a self-perpetuating cycle maintaining chronic cough. These results may partly explain the poor efficacy of traditional drugs, such as those targeting gastric acidity in the treatment of chronic cough.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Gastroenterological Association. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Jaclyn A. Smith, Samantha Decalmer, Angela Kelsall, Kevin McGuinness, Helen Jones, Simon Galloway, Ashley Woodcock, Lesley A. Houghton. Acoustic Cough-Reflux Associations in Chronic Cough: Potential Triggers and Mechanisms. Gastroenterology, 2010; 139 (3): 754 DOI: 10.1053/j.gastro.2010.06.050

Cite This Page:

American Gastroenterological Association. "New sound recording device helps doctors study link between cough and reflux." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100927105209.htm>.
American Gastroenterological Association. (2010, October 14). New sound recording device helps doctors study link between cough and reflux. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 31, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100927105209.htm
American Gastroenterological Association. "New sound recording device helps doctors study link between cough and reflux." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100927105209.htm (accessed January 31, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, January 31, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

CDC: Get Vaccinated for Measles

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 30, 2015) The CDC is urging people to get vaccinated for measles amid an outbreak that began at Disneyland and has now infected more than 90 people. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama To Outline New Plan For Personalized Medicine

Obama To Outline New Plan For Personalized Medicine

Newsy (Jan. 30, 2015) President Obama is expected to speak with drugmakers Friday about his Precision Medicine Initiative first introduced last week. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
NFL Concussions Down; Still on Parents' Minds

NFL Concussions Down; Still on Parents' Minds

AP (Jan. 30, 2015) The NFL announced this week that the number of game concussions dropped by a quarter over last season. Still, the dangers of the sport still weigh on players, and parents&apos; minds. (Jan. 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.S. Wants to Analyze DNA from 1 Million People

U.S. Wants to Analyze DNA from 1 Million People

Reuters - US Online Video (Jan. 30, 2015) The U.S. has proposed analyzing genetic information from more than 1 million American volunteers to learn how genetic variants affect health and disease. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins