Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Key action of a gene linked to both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes identified

Date:
September 29, 2010
Source:
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine
Summary:
A research team has identified the mechanism behind a single gene linked to the causes of both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes. The data show that a gene for a protein called SorCS1, which can cause type 2 diabetes, impacts the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) in the brain. Abeta plays a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

A research team led by Mount Sinai School of Medicine has identified the mechanism behind a single gene linked to the causes of both Alzheimer's disease and Type 2 diabetes. The data show that a gene for a protein called SorCS1, which can cause Type 2 diabetes, impacts the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Abeta) in the brain. Abeta plays a key role in the development of Alzheimer's disease.

The study is published in the September 29th issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

Sam Gandy, MD, PhD, the Mount Sinai Professor in Alzheimer's Disease Research, Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry, and Associate Director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, led the study, together with first author Rachel Lane, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher in Gandy's Lab. Lane and Gandy analyzed both the brains of mice genetically engineered to be deficient in SorCS1 as well as cells engineered to express high levels of SorCS1. They found an increased level of Abeta in SorCS1-deficient mice, and low levels of Abeta in the cells overexpressing SorCS1.

"We knew that Type 2 diabetes could increase the risk for Alzheimer's disease, but we were not sure how that risk was caused or whether that diabetes risk would impact Abeta levels in the brain," said Dr. Gandy. "These results elucidate a common mechanism between diabetes and Alzheimer's and will bring us a step closer to identifying effective treatments for both diseases."

The researchers were also interested to find that the SorCS1-deficient mice had decreased levels of the protein Vps35, which was linked to Alzheimer's by Scott Small, MD, Associate Professor of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, who co-authored the new study with Gandy. They propose that depleted SorCS1 may cause Vps35 levels to also decrease, leading to further accumulation of Abeta in mice. Further studies are required to better understand the impact of SorCS1 on Vps35 levels.

SorCS1 deficiency has been linked to Type 2 diabetes by geneticist Alan Attie, PhD, Professor of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin, who also co-authored the new study. Rudolph E. Tanzi, PhD, Joseph P. and Rose F. Kennedy Professor of Neurology and Director of Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Harvard Medical School also contributed genetic data to the new study. Now that Dr. Gandy and his team have connected the same protein to increased Abeta levels, they can evaluate this protein and the family of proteins of which it is a member as drug targets for the treatment of both diseases.

"Alzheimer's and Type 2 diabetes are reaching epidemic levels, afflicting millions of Americans," said Dr. Gandy. "Their risk factors overlap and include high cholesterol, obesity, vascular disease, and inflammation. Now that we have a better understanding of where the connection between these two diseases originates on a molecular level, the next step is to develop drugs that will help reduce their devastating impact. Such drugs will require much more research, but having this new target helps put us on the right track."

The study was supported by the Cure Alzheimer's Fund, the National Institute on Aging, and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. R. F. Lane, S. M. Raines, J. W. Steele, M. E. Ehrlich, J. A. Lah, S. A. Small, R. E. Tanzi, A. D. Attie, S. Gandy. Diabetes-Associated SorCS1 Regulates Alzheimer's Amyloid-β Metabolism: Evidence for Involvement of SorL1 and the Retromer Complex. Journal of Neuroscience, 2010; 30 (39): 13110 DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3872-10.2010

Cite This Page:

The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine. "Key action of a gene linked to both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes identified." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 September 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100928171553.htm>.
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine. (2010, September 29). Key action of a gene linked to both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes identified. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100928171553.htm
The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine. "Key action of a gene linked to both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes identified." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100928171553.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Friday, August 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

House Republicans Vote to Sue Obama Over Healthcare Law

Reuters - US Online Video (July 31, 2014) The Republican-led House of Representatives votes to sue President Obama, accusing him of overstepping his executive authority in making changes to the Affordable Care Act. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Despite Health Questions, E-Cigs Are Beneficial: Study

Newsy (July 31, 2014) Citing 81 previous studies, new research out of London suggests the benefits of smoking e-cigarettes instead of regular ones outweighs the risks. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

Dangerous Bacteria Kills One in Florida

AP (July 31, 2014) Sarasota County, Florida health officials have issued a warning against eating raw oysters and exposing open wounds to coastal and inland waters after a dangerous bacteria killed one person and made another sick. (July 31) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Health Insurers' Profits Slide

Reuters - Business Video Online (July 30, 2014) Obamacare-related costs were said to be behind the profit plunge at Wellpoint and Humana, but Wellpoint sees the new exchanges boosting its earnings for the full year. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins