Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Adding topotecan to standard treatment for ovarian cancer does not improve progression-free survival, study finds

Date:
October 11, 2010
Source:
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Summary:
Adding topotecan to carboplatin plus paclitaxel, the standard treatment for ovarian cancer, does not improve progression-free survival in patients and leads to greater toxicity, according to a new study.

Adding topotecan to carboplatin plus paclitaxel, the standard treatment for ovarian cancer, does not improve progression-free survival in patients and leads to greater toxicity, according to a study published online Oct. 11 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Cisplatin plus paclitaxel, and carboplatin plus paclitaxel, are the most widely accepted first-line regimens for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Still, most women relapse and die from their disease. One possible solution is to add a third agent, such as topotecan, which has activity in the treatment of recurrent disease. However, combining topotecan with carboplatin plus paclitaxel as a triplet therapy is problematic because of bone marrow toxicity. So, to integrate topotecan into the standard regimen researchers tested cisplatin plus topotecan followed by carboplatin plus paclitaxel.

The phase III randomized study included 819 women aged 28-78 with newly-diagnosed stage IIB or more advanced ovarian cancer. The study was led by Paul Hoskins, M.D., of the British Columbia Cancer Agency in Vancouver and colleagues from three other groups: the NCIC Clinical Trials Group at Queen's University in Kingston, Canada, the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer -- Gynecologic Cancer Group, European Union, and the Grupo Espańol de Investigaci๓n en Cแncer de Ovario in Spain.

The women in the study were from Canada and Europe, and were randomly assigned to one of two study groups: the first arm received cisplatin and topotecan, followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel; the second arm received only carboplatin and paclitaxel.

The researchers found that after a median follow-up of 43 months, 650 patients had disease progression and 406 had died. The progression-free survival of patients in the first arm was 14.6 months compared to 16.2 months for those in the second arm. Furthermore, although survival data were not mature, there is no evidence to date that patients receiving topotecan had improved survival (with a median overall survival of 42.3 months for patients in the first arm, compared to 42.1 months for those in the second).

Patients in the first arm also had more toxicity than those in the second. The common side effects included gastrointestinal symptoms, myelosuppression, neurological toxicity and myalgia. Patients in the first arm had more myelotoxicity, nausea and vomiting, while patients in the second had more neurosensory effects and allergic reactions.

The authors concluded that carboplatin plus paclitaxel remains the best standard of care for epithelial ovarian cancer stage IIB or greater. They write, "The most sensible explanation for this lack of additional benefit is that the topotecan does not have sufficient cytotoxic impact on cells that are truly refractory to platins or taxanes."

Furthermore, they explain that a drug such as topotecan needs to be effective in the refractory setting -- when the cancer grows during treatment -- and not just in the resistant setting -- when it recurs shortly after the end of treatment. They write, "Further cytotoxic drugs need to be able to convincingly kill truly refractory cells before being added to the preexisting standard drug or drugs for efficacy testing."

In an accompanying editorial, William P. McGuire, M.D., of the Weinberg Cancer Institute at Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore, writes that the trial provides further confirmation of the inactivity of topotecan to treat standard ovarian cancer. He writes, "In the end, neither the dose of topotecan, sequence of drug administration, nor platinum compound used in combination made any difference."

McGuire also points to the emergence of targeted therapies to treat ovarian cancer instead of cytotoxic agents. He writes, "Clearly, the lack of any benefit from adding topotecan, gemcitabine, or pegylated liposomal doxorubicin to the platinum/taxane in the intergroup trial has signaled the need to try new approaches."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. P. Hoskins, I. Vergote, A. Cervantes, D. Tu, G. Stuart, P. Zola, A. Poveda, D. Provencher, D. Katsaros, B. Ojeda, P. Ghatage, R. Grimshaw, A. Casado, L. Elit, C. Mendiola, A. Sugimoto, V. D’Hondt, A. Oza, J. R. Germa, M. Roy, L. Brotto, D. Chen, and E. A. Eisenhauer. Advanced Ovarian Cancer: Phase III Randomized Study of Sequential Cisplatin–Topotecan and Carboplatin–Paclitaxel vs Carboplatin–Paclitaxel. Journal of the National Cancer Institute, 2010; DOI: 10.1093/jnci/djq362

Cite This Page:

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Adding topotecan to standard treatment for ovarian cancer does not improve progression-free survival, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101011173454.htm>.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2010, October 11). Adding topotecan to standard treatment for ovarian cancer does not improve progression-free survival, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101011173454.htm
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. "Adding topotecan to standard treatment for ovarian cancer does not improve progression-free survival, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101011173454.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) — An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Thousands Who Can't Afford Medical Care Flock to Free US Clinic

Thousands Who Can't Afford Medical Care Flock to Free US Clinic

AFP (July 23, 2014) — America may be the world’s richest country, but in terms of healthcare, the World Health Organisation ranks it 37th. Thousands turned out for a free clinic run by "Remote Area Medical" with a visit from the Governor of Virginia. Duration: 2:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) — The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) — The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins