Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Airbags reduce risk of kidney injury in car crashes, study finds

Date:
October 23, 2010
Source:
American College of Surgeons
Summary:
Occupants in motor vehicles with airbags are much less likely to suffer kidney or renal damage in a crash than are occupants in vehicles without airbags, according to a new study.

Occupants in motor vehicles with airbags are much less likely to suffer kidney or renal damage in a crash than are occupants in vehicles without airbags, according to a new study in the September Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

Related Articles


Little is known about how to prevent or reduce injury to solid organs from motor vehicle collisions. In fact, this study is the first to evaluate the protective effect of airbags on a specific organ system -- in this case, the kidney and other renal, or upper urinary tract, organs.

The researchers found that compared with the non-airbag group of crash patients, front-impact airbags were associated with a 45.3 percent reduction in renal injuries and side-impact airbags were associated with a 52.8 percent reduction in renal injuries. The importance of these finding is underscored by the fact that motor vehicle crashes are the most common source of blunt force trauma to the kidney, accounting for from 48 percent to 66 percent of all such injuries.

"The sharp reduction in the rate of kidney injury was surprising because airbags are primarily designed to protect the head and spine," said Thomas G. Smith III, MD, assistant professor of urology in the Department of Surgery at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston. "These findings warrant additional investigation into the role airbags could play in protecting the kidney and other organs during a crash."

In the crashes that involved renal injury, 54.7 percent were front-impact and 45.3 percent were side-impact. In the front-impact crashes, 74.9 percent involved a driver-side airbag and 16.6 percent involved a passenger-side airbag. For the side impact crashes, 32.2 percent of occupants had a side-impact airbag.

Researchers analyzed 2,864 records in the Crash Injury Research and Engineering (CIREN) database from 1996 to September 2008 and identified 139 kidney injuries in crashes in motor vehicles with and without airbags. The CIREN database was developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to provide detailed crash site analysis and specific occupant injury data to aid in the study of prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of motor vehicle crash injuries. In 2008, there were about 6 million police-reported motor vehicle crashes in the U.S. that resulted in 2.3 million injuries and 37,261 deaths.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American College of Surgeons. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Thomas G. Smith III, Hunter B. Wessells, Chris D. Mack, Robert Kaufman, Eileen M. Bulger, Bryan B. Voelzke. Examination of the Impact of Airbags on Renal Injury Using a National Database. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 2010; 211 (3): 355 DOI: 10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2010.05.009

Cite This Page:

American College of Surgeons. "Airbags reduce risk of kidney injury in car crashes, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101021113017.htm>.
American College of Surgeons. (2010, October 23). Airbags reduce risk of kidney injury in car crashes, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101021113017.htm
American College of Surgeons. "Airbags reduce risk of kidney injury in car crashes, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101021113017.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, November 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Late Cocoa Leaves Bitter Taste

AFP (Nov. 23, 2014) The arable district of Kenema in Sierra Leone -- at the centre of the Ebola outbreak in May -- has been under quarantine for three months as the cocoa harvest comes in. Duration: 01:32 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Don't Fall For Flu Shot Myths

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Misconceptions abound when it comes to your annual flu shot. Medical experts say most people older than 6 months should get the shot. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Could Your Genes Be The Reason You're Single?

Newsy (Nov. 21, 2014) Researchers in Beijing discovered a gene called 5-HTA1, and carriers are reportedly 20 percent more likely to be single. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins