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Tiny brained bees solve a complex mathematical problem

Date:
October 25, 2010
Source:
University of Royal Holloway London
Summary:
Bumblebees can find the solution to a complex mathematical problem which keeps computers busy for days. Scientists in the UK have discovered that bees learn to fly the shortest possible route between flowers even if they discover the flowers in a different order. Bees are effectively solving the 'Traveling Salesman Problem', and these are the first animals found to do this.

New research shows that bumblebees can find the solution to a complex mathematical problem which keeps computers busy for days.
Credit: iStockphoto/Alexey Kryuchkov

Bumblebees can find the solution to a complex mathematical problem which keeps computers busy for days.

Scientists at Royal Holloway, University of London and Queen Mary, University of London have discovered that bees learn to fly the shortest possible route between flowers even if they discover the flowers in a different order. Bees are effectively solving the 'Travelling Salesman Problem', and these are the first animals found to do this.

The Travelling Salesman must find the shortest route that allows him to visit all locations on his route. Computers solve it by comparing the length of all possible routes and choosing the shortest. However, bees solve it without computer assistance using a brain the size of grass seed.

Dr Nigel Raine, from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway explains: "Foraging bees solve travelling salesman problems every day. They visit flowers at multiple locations and, because bees use lots of energy to fly, they find a route which keeps flying to a minimum."

The team used computer controlled artificial flowers to test whether bees would follow a route defined by the order in which they discovered the flowers or if they would find the shortest route. After exploring the location of the flowers, bees quickly learned to fly the shortest route.

As well as enhancing our understanding of how bees move around the landscape pollinating crops and wild flowers, this research, which is due to be published in The American Naturalist, has other applications. Our lifestyle relies on networks such as traffic on the roads, information flow on the web and business supply chains. By understanding how bees can solve their problem with such a tiny brain we can improve our management of these everyday networks without needing lots of computer time.

Dr Raine adds: "Despite their tiny brains bees are capable of extraordinary feats of behaviour. We need to understand how they can solve the Travelling Salesman Problem without a computer. What short-cuts do they use?'


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Royal Holloway London. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mathieu Lihoreau, Lars Chittka, Nigel E. Raine. Travel optimization by foraging bumblebees through readjustments of traplines after discovery of new feeding locations. The American Naturalist, 2010; DOI: 10.1086/657042

Cite This Page:

University of Royal Holloway London. "Tiny brained bees solve a complex mathematical problem." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 October 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101025090020.htm>.
University of Royal Holloway London. (2010, October 25). Tiny brained bees solve a complex mathematical problem. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101025090020.htm
University of Royal Holloway London. "Tiny brained bees solve a complex mathematical problem." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/10/101025090020.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

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