Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Proteasome inhibitor reduces inflammation and promotes bone healing in arthritis models

Date:
November 5, 2010
Source:
Wiley - Blackwell
Summary:
A new study by Greek researchers suggests that the biologic drug bortezomib (Velcade), a proteasome inhibitor used to treat multiple myeloma (bone marrow cancer), may represent a promising treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, bortezomib displayed favorable effects in an animal model of inflammatory arthritis that mimics RA, in reducing disease severity and inflammation, and promoting bone healing.

A new study by Greek researchers suggests that the biologic drug bortezomib (Velcade), a proteasome inhibitor used to treat multiple myeloma (bone marrow cancer), may represent a promising treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, bortezomib displayed favorable effects in an animal model of inflammatory arthritis that mimics RA, in reducing disease severity and inflammation, and promoting bone healing.

Related Articles


Full findings of this study are published in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and joint destruction. The newer biologics, such as the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, have increased the therapeutic options for patients with RA. However, studies have shown that more than 50% of patients treated with a TNF inhibitor do not meet the ACR 50 improvement criteria -- a standard set of measures developed by the college to determine efficacy of drugs in clinical trials.

"The definitive role of biologic agents in treating this difficult-to-cure population has yet to be defined in prospective trials comparing the available therapeutic options," explained study leader Evangelia Yannaki, M.D, of George Papanicolaou Hospital in Thessaloniki, Greece. "Given the lack of options for poor responders and the increased risk of infections and malignancies with available biologic agents for RA, there is a great need for novel therapies that are safe and effective."

The research team explored bortezomib as an optimal treatment for RA because the drug targets multiple pathways. In RA, the most important proinflammatory mediators are regulated by the transcription factor NF-•B -- proteins that control genes involved in inflammation and the immune response to infection. Where bortezomib inhibits NF-•B, researchers speculate that the drug may improve autoimmune conditions, such as RA, which are characterized by chronic inflammation.

The analysis demonstrated that in vitro, bortezomib significantly reduced proliferation and increased death of the inflammatory cells in rats with adjuvant induced arthritis (AIA), thereby reducing invasiveness of fibroblast-like cells that are responsible for the damage to the lining of the joints; it also modified the pattern of protein cell signaling (cytokine secretion) in T-lymphocytes that are involved in the immune system response. In vivo, bortezomib significantly improved clinical manifestations of arthritis in these animals, even when administered during the advanced disease phase. Researchers noted that joints in animals treated with the drug displayed limited damage and inflammation, and an obvious bone healing effect was observed.

"Our research showed that bortezomib is a useful treatment in targeting critical cell populations involved in the development of inflammation and autoimmunity in RA," concluded Dr. Yannaki. "We believe that bortezomib should be further explored in a clinical setting, as it represents an attractive intervention for inflammatory conditions and a highly promising agent in the treatment of RA."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wiley - Blackwell. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Evangelia Yannaki, Anastasia Papadopoulou, Evangelia Athanasiou, Panayotis Kaloyannidis, Argyro Paraskeva, Dimitris Bougiouklis, Panayotis Palladas, Minas Yiangou, Achilles Anagnostopoulos. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib drastically affects inflammation and bone disease in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Arthritis & Rheumatism, 2010; 62 (11): 3277 DOI: 10.1002/art.27690

Cite This Page:

Wiley - Blackwell. "Proteasome inhibitor reduces inflammation and promotes bone healing in arthritis models." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101103082310.htm>.
Wiley - Blackwell. (2010, November 5). Proteasome inhibitor reduces inflammation and promotes bone healing in arthritis models. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101103082310.htm
Wiley - Blackwell. "Proteasome inhibitor reduces inflammation and promotes bone healing in arthritis models." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101103082310.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

WHO: Millions of Ebola Vaccine Doses by 2015

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) The World Health Organization said on Friday that millions of doses of two experimental Ebola vaccines could be ready for use in 2015 and five more experimental vaccines would start being tested in March. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

Doctor in NYC Quarantined With Ebola

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus. He's quarantined in a hospital. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins