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Kids with larger waist sizes are more likely to have cardiac risk factors

Date:
November 22, 2010
Source:
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed)
Summary:
In a study of more than 4,500 children, researchers found those with higher waist circumferences had significantly higher pulse pressures, which is known to be linked to increased risk of heart-related disorders.
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In a study of more than 4,500 children, researchers found those with higher waist circumferences had significantly higher pulse pressures, which is known to be linked to increased risk of heart-related disorders.

Gangadarshni Chandramohan, MD, a researcher at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed) and the lead author of the abstract, said the research team studied data from 4,667 children aged 6 to 17 years who were part of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The study's authors advocate for measuring waist circumference -- rather than body mass index -- during routine physical examinations to identify children who are at risk for heart disease.

"We found the children's body mass didn't correlate to higher pulse pressures, but their waist circumference did," Dr. Chandramohan said. "This study suggests pediatricians add waist measurements to their routine screening of children to help determine the risk of heart-related disorders. Measuring waist circumference is a much simpler, more cost-effective and a more valid method of screening for the risk of heart-related disorders than the current practice of determining a child's body mass."

Previous studies have found a high pulse pressure -- the difference between the systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings -- increases a patient's risk of heart-related disorders -- as does high blood pressure.

"It is crucial that new indices for measuring various physiologic parameters such as obesity and associated cardiovascular risk factors be determined using valid, minimally invasive and cost-effective tools to help patients avoid long-term health concerns," said Dr. Chandramohan.

Study co-authors included: Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, PhD, LA BioMed; Sheena Cecille Marie Go, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, and Keith Norris, MD, and Dulcie Kermah, both from Charles Drew University School of Medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed). "Kids with larger waist sizes are more likely to have cardiac risk factors." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101121122609.htm>.
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed). (2010, November 22). Kids with larger waist sizes are more likely to have cardiac risk factors. ScienceDaily. Retrieved May 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101121122609.htm
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (LA BioMed). "Kids with larger waist sizes are more likely to have cardiac risk factors." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101121122609.htm (accessed May 3, 2015).

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