Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Crucial sex hormones re-routed by missing molecule

Date:
November 29, 2010
Source:
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Summary:
A hormone responsible for the onset of puberty can end up stuck in the wrong part of the body if the nerve pathways responsible for its transport to the brain fail to develop properly, according to new research.

An optical section through a normal mouse nose showing the route the nerve cables (yellow) normally transport the GnRH through the nose (blue). The red shows the corridor inside the nose through which the nerve cables like to travel.
Credit: Dr Anna Cariboni

A hormone responsible for the onset of puberty can end up stuck in the wrong part of the body if the nerve pathways responsible for its transport to the brain fail to develop properly, according to research funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC).

By tracking how nerve cells responsible for regulating sexual reproduction in mice find their way from their birth place in the foetal nose to their site of action in the adult brain, scientists from University College London (UCL) have found that if a certain molecule is missing, then these pathways are not formed correctly and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) can become lodged in the nose or the forehead, rather than in the brain, where it is needed to control the menstrual cycle in females and testosterone production in males.

Speaking about the findings, published November 29 in Human Molecular Genetics, co-investigator Dr Christiana Ruhrberg explains: "We discovered that a molecule essential for the growth of the nerve cables that transmit odour and pheromone signals from the nose to the brain is also crucial in the development of the highways responsible for transporting other nerve cells that make the sex hormone GnRH. We found that in mice with an inherited deficiency in the molecule SEMA3A, these highways did not lead to the brain, but instead formed impenetrable tangles outside the brain. This means that the nerve cells making GnRH are unable to get to their final destination and instead become stuck in the nose or forehead."

As a result the researchers found that the testes of mice lacking SEMA3A did not grow properly and the adult males were infertile. These findings have important implications for the study of Kallmann's syndrome and related genetic disorders that causes infertility.

Professor Douglas Kell, BBSRC Chief Executive said "This study highlights the importance of understanding the very earliest developmental processes of the brain, including how and where cells develop, how they migrate and how and where they mature. Such fundamental bioscience research helps drive medical advances by providing clues about the development of a variety of disorders which present huge challenges to individuals, their families and our wider society."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. A. Cariboni, K. Davidson, S. Rakic, R. Maggi, J. G. Parnavelas, C. Ruhrberg. Defective gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuron migration in mice lacking SEMA3A signalling through NRP1 and NRP2: implications for the aetiology of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Human Molecular Genetics, 2010; DOI: 10.1093/hmg/ddq468

Cite This Page:

Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. "Crucial sex hormones re-routed by missing molecule." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 November 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101129102111.htm>.
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. (2010, November 29). Crucial sex hormones re-routed by missing molecule. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101129102111.htm
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council. "Crucial sex hormones re-routed by missing molecule." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/11/101129102111.htm (accessed September 18, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Artificial Sweetener Could Promote Diabetes

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) Doctors once thought artificial sweeteners lacked the health risks of sugar, but a new study says they can impact blood sugar levels the same way. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

Ebola Vaccine Trial Gets Underway at Oxford University

AFP (Sep. 17, 2014) A healthy British volunteer is to become the first person to receive a new vaccine for the Ebola virus after US President Barack Obama called for action against the epidemic and warned it was "spiralling out of control." Duration: 01:02 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obesity Rates Steady Even As Americans' Waistlines Expand

Obesity Rates Steady Even As Americans' Waistlines Expand

Newsy (Sep. 17, 2014) Researchers are puzzled as to why obesity rates remain relatively stable as average waistlines continue to expand. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins