Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New approaches needed for treating chronic myeloid leukemia

Date:
December 13, 2010
Source:
Journal of Clinical Investigation
Summary:
The drug imatinib transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) from a fatal disease to a chronic condition. However, imatinib must be taken lifelong, because it fails to kill a residual number of CML cells. New research, has now determined why these cells don't respond to imatinib -- they do not need the protein imatinib targets for their survival. Therefore, new approaches are needed if further advances are to be made in the care of CML patients.

The drug imatinib transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) from a fatal disease to a chronic condition. However, imatinib must be taken lifelong, because it fails to kill a residual number of CML cells. New research, has now determined why these cells don't respond to imatinib -- they do not need the protein imatinib targets for their survival. Therefore, new approaches are needed if further advances are to be made in the care of CML patients.

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was transformed from a fatal disease to a chronic condition by the development of a drug known as imatinib, which targets the protein that drives this disease (BCR-ABL).

However, imatinib does not cure patients, they must take the drug lifelong, as disease recurs if they stop taking it. This is because imatinib does not kill all the CML cells; some, which are known as CML stem cells, persist. A key to therapeutically targeting CML stem cells is knowing whether they rely on BCR-ABL to persist. Answers to this will determine whether more effective BCR-ABL inhibitors are likely to be effective treatments or whether new approaches to targeting these cells need to be developed.

A team of researchers, led by Brian Drucker and Michael Deininger, at Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, has now shown clearly that human CML stem cells do not depend on BCR-ABL activity for survival and are thus not eliminated by imatinib therapy. As noted by the authors and, in an accompany commentary, Alexander Perl and Martin Carroll, at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, the data indicate that therapeutics targeting BCR-ABL will not improve CML treatment and that new approaches are needed if further advances in patient care are to be made.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Journal of Clinical Investigation. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal References:

  1. Alexander Perl and Martin Carroll. BCR-ABL kinase is dead; long live the CML stem cell. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2010 DOI: 10.1172/JCI43605
  2. Amie S. Corbin, Anupriya Agarwal, Marc Loriaux, Jorge Cortes, Michael W. Deininger and Brian J. Druker. Human chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells are insensitive to imatinib despite inhibition of BCR-ABL activity. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2010 DOI: 10.1172/JCI35721

Cite This Page:

Journal of Clinical Investigation. "New approaches needed for treating chronic myeloid leukemia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 December 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101213121702.htm>.
Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2010, December 13). New approaches needed for treating chronic myeloid leukemia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101213121702.htm
Journal of Clinical Investigation. "New approaches needed for treating chronic myeloid leukemia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/12/101213121702.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

President To Send 3,000 Military Personnel To Fight Ebola

Newsy (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is expected to send 3,000 troops to West Africa as part of the effort to contain Ebola's spread. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama Orders Military Response to Ebola

Obama Orders Military Response to Ebola

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) Calling the Ebola outbreak in West Africa a potential threat to global security, President Barack Obama is ordering 3,000 U.S. military personnel to the stricken region amid worries that the outbreak is spiraling out of control. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
UN: 20,000 Could Be Infected With Ebola by Year End

UN: 20,000 Could Be Infected With Ebola by Year End

AFP (Sep. 16, 2014) Nearly $1.0 billion dollars is needed to fight the Ebola outbreak raging in west Africa, the United Nations say, warning that 20,000 could be infected by year end. Duration: 00:40 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama: Ebola Outbreak Threat to Global Security

Obama: Ebola Outbreak Threat to Global Security

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) President Obama is ordering U.S. military personnel to West Africa to deal with the Ebola outbreak, which is he calls a potential threat to global security. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins