Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Researchers discover way to halt lung inflammation in animal models

Date:
January 16, 2011
Source:
University of Colorado Denver
Summary:
Acute inflammation of the lung is a poorly recognized human disease that develops in surprising and unexpected ways. However, an answer to halting lung inflammation may have been discovered, thanks to new research.

Acute inflammation of the lung is a poorly recognized human disease that develops in surprising and unexpected ways. The acute lung injury (ALI) or adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a vital new concern for soldiers, but it can develop in anyone during a systemic infection, after severe trauma, as a result of bone fracture, following severe burns and in many other ways as well-- the initial cause may have nothing apparent to do with the lung itself. However, an answer to halting lung inflammation may have been discovered, thanks to a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and his team.

Recent studies show that between 60,000 and 100,000 people die each year in the United States from ALI/ARDS, more than twice as many fatalities as those from breast cancer. Recognition that the disease represents an uncontrolled inflammation of the lung has led to some important developments for treatment but even today mortality hovers around 60 percent for those people in whom the disease was identified early enough to initiate treatment.

In a study titled "Xanthine Oxidoreductase Promotes the Inflammatory State of Mononuclear Phagocytes through Effects on Chemokine Expression, Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-γ Sumoylation, and HIF-1α" publishing January 14 in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers use animal models of ALI/ARDS to show that the aggressive inflammatory state of specific immune cells can be switched off to control the runaway inflammation.

"We now know that cells of the so called innate immune system, neutrophils and macrophages, are involved in causing lung injury that can result in lung failure and death," said Richard Wright, PhD, associate professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and lead study researcher. "While these cells are very important for our natural ability to fight off infection, the circumstances that lead to ALI/ARDS can overwhelm this beneficial role. Study of the neutrophils and macrophages that are responsible for ALI/ARDS has led to important ideas which offer hope for new concepts and options for treatment. For example, it is now known that the macrophage itself can exist in both an aggressive inflammatory state and in a more reparative state that can even help the lung to heal."

The researchers now have several drugs that work to achieve the same effect. Ideally, the researchers would like to see that by switching the state of the macrophages to the more reparative state, the ongoing inflammation will be stopped and the capacity of the lung to repair itself will improve.

"This could provide us with a vital new approach to treating this still devastating disease and reduce the persistent mortality of ALI/ARDS," said Wright.

"The results from this study clearly show how an essential enzyme involved in a vital metabolic pathway in our body can control the inflammatory state of key immune cells responsible for acute inflammatory diseases," said Mehdi Fini, MD, a research instructor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine and one of the authors of the paper. "The data from this study will also help us understand and dissect the molecular pathway involved in differential behavior of these cells in the pathogenesis of other diseases of the lung including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung fibrosis and lung cancer."

Other University of Colorado School of Medicine researchers who collaborated on the study include Jenifer Monks, PhD, and Sean Colgan, PhD.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Colorado Denver. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Gibbings, N. D. Elkins, H. Fitzgerald, J. Tiao, M. E. Weyman, G. Shibao, M. A. Fini, R. M. Wright. Xanthine Oxidoreductase Promotes the Inflammatory State of Mononuclear Phagocytes through Effects on Chemokine Expression, Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-γSumoylation, and HIF-1α. Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2010; 286 (2): 961 DOI: 10.1074/jbc.M110.150847

Cite This Page:

University of Colorado Denver. "Researchers discover way to halt lung inflammation in animal models." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 January 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110114155402.htm>.
University of Colorado Denver. (2011, January 16). Researchers discover way to halt lung inflammation in animal models. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110114155402.htm
University of Colorado Denver. "Researchers discover way to halt lung inflammation in animal models." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/01/110114155402.htm (accessed September 1, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

Get on Your Bike! London Cycling Popularity Soars Despite Danger

AFP (Sep. 1, 2014) Wedged between buses, lorries and cars, cycling in London isn't for the faint hearted. Nevertheless the number of people choosing to bike in the British capital has doubled over the past 15 years. Duration: 02:27 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

We've Got Mites Living In Our Faces And So Do You

Newsy (Aug. 30, 2014) A new study suggests 100 percent of adult humans (those over 18 years of age) have Demodex mites living in their faces. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

Liberia Continues Fight Against Ebola

AFP (Aug. 30, 2014) Authorities in Liberia try to stem the spread of the Ebola epidemic by raising awareness and setting up sanitation units for people to wash their hands. Duration: 00:41 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

California Passes 'yes-Means-Yes' Campus Sexual Assault Bill

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 30, 2014) California lawmakers pass a bill requiring universities to adopt "affirmative consent" language in their definitions of consensual sex, part of a nationwide drive to curb sexual assault on campuses. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins