Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Salivary glands as organs of immunity: New research makes oral immunization easier to swallow

Date:
February 10, 2011
Source:
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Summary:
If you don't like shots or needles, you're in luck. New research gives the development of new oral vaccinations a shot in the arm.

If you don't like shots or needles, you're in luck. New research published online in The FASEB Journal gives the development of new oral vaccinations a shot in the arm thanks to discoveries involving the salivary glands of mice. In addition, this research report also offers a tantalizing glimpse of vaccines that could prevent infection at mucosal surfaces, even if direct injections into the body fail to cause immunity. This technique may be effective for a wide range of diseases from influenza to cholera.

Related Articles


"Our work highlights the ability of the salivary glands to act as an alternative mucosal route for administering vaccines, which would lead to protective immune responses both locally and systemically," said Lucille London, Ph.D., a researcher involved in the work from the School of Dental Medicine and Department of Oral Biology and Pathology at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, NY. "Thus, in the future, salivary gland inoculation may become a clinically acceptable method in which to vaccinate groups of individuals against new and emerging pathogenic challenges."

To make this advance, the researchers studied two groups of mice. The first group received live cytomegalovirus directly into their salivary glands. These mice demonstrated an immune response in the salivary glands, and the researchers observed an increase in the number and types of cells associated with antibodies that were protective in the saliva. Importantly, these antibodies were also found in other mucosal secretions and in the serum of these mice, suggesting that these proteins spread to other locations in the body. Additionally, the researchers observed structural and functional changes in the immunized salivary glands, causing them to resemble lymph node-like structures commonly seen in injection-based immunizations. The second group of mice was given an inactive virus that did not cause an infection in the salivary glands. These mice demonstrated no active immune response when compared to the first group. When both sets of mice were exposed to the same virus at a later time, only the group immunized with an active virus was protected from future infection. This discovery opens the doors for similar research involving the use of weakened viruses to determine if they will also confer immunity through salivary glands.

"It's no fun for doctors or parents when kids struggle during routine immunization," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "It's even less fun when you are dealing with adults who are deathly afraid of shots in various parts of their body. This work shows that salivary glands may become the first line of defense in active and passive immunization."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. S. Grewal, M. J. Pilgrim, S. Grewal, L. Kasman, P. Werner, M. E. Bruorton, S. D. London, L. London. Salivary glands act as mucosal inductive sites via the formation of ectopic germinal centers after site-restricted MCMV infection. The FASEB Journal, 2011; DOI: 10.1096/fj.10-174656

Cite This Page:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Salivary glands as organs of immunity: New research makes oral immunization easier to swallow." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110210094917.htm>.
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. (2011, February 10). Salivary glands as organs of immunity: New research makes oral immunization easier to swallow. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110210094917.htm
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. "Salivary glands as organs of immunity: New research makes oral immunization easier to swallow." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110210094917.htm (accessed March 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

AFP (Mar. 28, 2015) — Sierra Leone imposed a three-day nationwide lockdown Friday for the second time in six months in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) — A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) — The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) — In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins