Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Preterm birth clinic attendence leads to major reduction in infant disability

Date:
February 15, 2011
Source:
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Summary:
Researchers have found that when women at high risk for preterm birth participated in a preterm birth prevention clinic, more women delivered full term babies and there were fewer cases of infant morbidity.

In a study presented February 11 at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting ™, in San Francisco, researchers presented findings that show that when women at high risk for preterm birth participated in a preterm birth prevention clinic, more women delivered full term babies and there were fewer cases of infant morbidity.

The National Center for Health Statistic reports that in 2008, 12.3% of babies were born prematurely. Women who have had a prior preterm birth are at high risk to have another one. In 2008, Intermountain Healthcare created a preterm birth (PTB) prevention clinic to focus care for this high-risk population.

"We wanted to take a very aggressive approach to treating women with a history of preterm birth,' said Sean Esplin, M.D., of Intermountain Healthcare and one of the studies authors. "We gathered together the best treatments for women at high risk for preterm labor and administered them in a systematic way." He continued, "Then we designed a study to see if the intervention leads to better results in future pregnancies."

Esplin and his colleagues conducted a retrospective review of women with a single, non-anomalous fetus and ≥1 documented previous spontaneous PTB < 35 wks. Women enrolled in a PTB Prevention Clinic were compared with women identified from a contemporary large perinatal database (with ≥ 1 documented PTB < 35 wks followed by ≥ 1 subsequent pregnancies) who received Usual-Care. The PTB Prevention Clinic was consultative only and included three prescribed visits with a maternal fetal-medicine specialist and standardized management and counseling. All PTB Prevention Clinic patients were offered 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone caproate (17OHPC) and were followed with serial cervical-lengths (CL); recommendations for liberal antenatal corticosteroid and tocolytic use were also made. Usual-Care patients were managed by their primary obstetrician. The primary outcome was recurrent PTB. Data were analyzed by chi-square and Student's t-test.

Two hundred and thirty-two patients (70 PTB Prevention Clinic and 162 Usual-Care patients) met inclusion criteria. Groups had similar previous pregnancy characteristics. PTB Prevention Clinic patients had increased utilization of resources (including more cervical length ultrasounds and higher rates of use of prophylactic 17OHPC) and delivered at later gestational ages. Rates of NICU admission were similar between groups (44.3% vs. 40.7%, p=0.62). However, rates of major neonatal morbidity (diagnosis of NEC, BPD, IVH, sepsis, or death) were lower among PTB Prevention Clinic neonates (5.3% vs. 15.4%, p=0.025).

The study showed that among this high-risk population, referral to a consultative PTB Prevention Clinic (with standardized counseling, management recommendations, and close surveillance) resulted in a reduction in the rate of recurrent PTB prior to 37 weeks, lead to an average of a one week longer pregnancy, and reduced the rates of major neonatal morbidity.

"The study showed that participants in the preterm birth prevention clinic had a 28 percent reduction in the risk of recurrent spontaneous preterm birth, as well as reductions in infant complications and short term disabilities," said Tracy Manuck, M.D., one of the study's authors. "These are significant improvements and should lead more medical facilities to think about creating similar programs."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. "Preterm birth clinic attendence leads to major reduction in infant disability." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 February 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110211074550.htm>.
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. (2011, February 15). Preterm birth clinic attendence leads to major reduction in infant disability. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110211074550.htm
Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. "Preterm birth clinic attendence leads to major reduction in infant disability." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110211074550.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins