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Storytelling program improves lives of people with Alzheimer's

Date:
March 1, 2011
Source:
University of Missouri-Columbia
Summary:
Participation in TimeSlips, a creative storytelling intervention, improves communication and facilitates positive emotions in persons with dementia, researchers find. In the study a nursing researcher found that TimeSlips participants had increased expressions of pleasure and initiation of social communication.

A sample image from TimeSlips. TimeSlips was developed by Anne Basting, director of the Center on Age & Community at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of Missouri-Columbia

Nearly 16 million Americans will be diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia by 2050, according to the Alzheimer's Association. Symptoms include mood and behavior changes, disorientation, memory loss and difficulty walking and speaking. The effects of anti-dementia drugs on patients' emotions and behaviors are inconsistent. Now, University of Missouri researchers have found that participation in TimeSlips, a drug-free, creative storytelling intervention, improves communication skills and positive affect in persons with dementia.

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TimeSlips is a nationally recognized storytelling program for people with dementia that encourages participants to use their imaginations to create short stories as a group. Rather than relying on factual recall, participants respond verbally to humorous images presented by facilitators who record the responses and read narratives to further develop or end the stories.

"TimeSlips provides rich, engaging opportunities for persons with dementia to interact with others while exercising their individual strengths," said Lorraine Phillips, assistant professor in the Sinclair School of Nursing. "It encourages participants to be actively involved and to experience moments of recognition, creation and celebration. Meaningful activities, such as TimeSlips, promote positive social environments that are central to person-centered care."

The storytelling program is an easy and affordable activity for long-term care facilities to implement and allows caregivers to interact with multiple residents at a time, Phillips said.

"TimeSlips offers a stimulating alternative to typical activities in long-term care facilities," Phillips said. "It is an effective and simple option for care providers, especially those who lack resources or skills required for art, music or other creative interventions."

In the study, Phillips and her colleagues delivered the TimeSlips intervention in one-hour sessions, held twice weekly for six consecutive weeks. The results included increased expressions of pleasure and initiation of social communication. Improvements in participants' affect lasted several weeks following the final session. The intervention is acceptable for people with mild to moderate dementia, Phillips said.

Phillips worked with Stephanie Reid-Arndt, assistant professor of health psychology in the School of Health Professions, and Youngju Pak, assistant professor of health management and informatics in the School of Medicine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Missouri-Columbia. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Lorraine J. Phillips, Stephanie A. Reid-Arndt, Youngju Pak. Effects of a Creative Expression Intervention on Emotions, Communication, and Quality of Life in Persons With Dementia. Nursing Research, 2010; 59 (6): 417 DOI: 10.1097/NNR.0b013e3181faff52

Cite This Page:

University of Missouri-Columbia. "Storytelling program improves lives of people with Alzheimer's." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110225142828.htm>.
University of Missouri-Columbia. (2011, March 1). Storytelling program improves lives of people with Alzheimer's. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110225142828.htm
University of Missouri-Columbia. "Storytelling program improves lives of people with Alzheimer's." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/02/110225142828.htm (accessed October 31, 2014).

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