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Easy, accurate way to predict food allergies developed, study suggests

Date:
March 3, 2011
Source:
University College Cork
Summary:
An on-line calculator that predicts, within seconds, the presence of the three major food allergies in children has been developed. The new calculator gives 96% accuracy compared to current methods that are 61% -81% accurate.

Dr Audrey DunnGalvin, Department of Early Years and Childhood Studies and Research Fellow with the Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, UCC, Professor Jonathan Hourihane, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, UCC and Mr Kevin Dalton, Office of Tech Transfer, UCC
Credit: Image courtesy of University College Cork

An online calculator that predicts, within seconds, the presence of the three major food allergies in children has been developed by researchers at University College Cork. They have devised a new 'Cork-Southampton calculator' that gives 96% accuracy compared to current methods that are 61% -81% accurate. The research will be published online March 3 in the journal, Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology.

Food allergies have increased over the past decade as has the number of patients and parents seeking diagnosis. Double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges are the gold standard for diagnosing food allergy, but they are time-consuming, costly and, often, a source of parental and medical fear that a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) might occur during a food challenge. In addition, not all clinical facilities have the staff or resources to carry out high quality food challenges.

The two Cork researchers, Dr Audrey DunnGalvin and Professor Jonathan Hourihane of the Department of Paediatrics and Child Health devised a highly accurate, allergen-specific algorithims for each of the most important food types (cow's milk, egg, peanut). The mathematical model consisted of known or suspected predictors that when combined greatly increased the accuracy of the final model. The researchers reasoned and proved that the more clinical information that could be considered, the more accurate the predictive model would be.

They looked at the outcomes of combinations of data on clinical factors (skin prick test, allergen specific IgE in serum, total IgE, allergic reaction history, sex and age). The researchers then compared those to the results of the children's food challenges. From this analysis, they developed an effective prediction model, a 'calculator' of a positive food challenge that was a more accurate predictor than individual allergy tests.

This new calculator will improve the quality of life of parents and patients (on average seven years old) and will reduce significantly the cost of food allergy tests. "Young children can find the normal food allergy tests quite stressful and this test will take a lot of the distress out of the process, even just by delaying a challenge until the odds of passing it improve over time, which is the norm." says Dr Audrey DunnGalvin. "It has also implications for oral immunotherapy where clinicians try to desensitise children to their allergies by giving them controlled doses of the food to which they are allergic. The Cork-Southampton calculator will help assess appropriate stop/continue/ maintenance points in this treatment."

"Conventional food allergy tests are less than perfect but the UCC patented diagnostic is very reliable and should replace uncertainty with certainty for many doctors treating children with food allergy," says Kevin Dalton of UCC's Office of Technology Transfer. "We foresee a commercial product being launched this year resulting in better patient care and substantial savings for the healthcare service."

Article title: Highly accurate prediction of food challenge outcome using routinely available clinical data


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University College Cork. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. L.M. Segal, J.O.B. Hourihane, A. Clarke, R. Alizadehfar, J. Lucas, G. Roberts, M. Lajeunesse, A. DunnGalvin. A Systematic Evaluation of the Cork-Southampton Food Challenge Outcome Calculator in a Canadian Sample. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2011; 127 (2): AB184 DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2010.12.732

Cite This Page:

University College Cork. "Easy, accurate way to predict food allergies developed, study suggests." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 March 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110303065400.htm>.
University College Cork. (2011, March 3). Easy, accurate way to predict food allergies developed, study suggests. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110303065400.htm
University College Cork. "Easy, accurate way to predict food allergies developed, study suggests." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/03/110303065400.htm (accessed April 16, 2014).

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