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Older age memory loss tied to stress hormone receptor in brain

Date:
April 6, 2011
Source:
University of Edinburgh
Summary:
Scientists have shed new light on how older people may lose their memory with a development that could aid research into treatments for age-related memory disorders. Many believe that stress is bad for our brains especially as we get older. Now researchers have shown how two receptors in older brains react to a stress hormone called cortisol, which has been linked to increasing forgetfulness as we age.

Scientists have shed new light on how older people may lose their memory. The development could aid research into treatments for age-related memory disorders.

Stress and memory

Many believe that stress is bad for our brains especially as we get older. Now University researchers have shown how two receptors in older brains react to a stress hormone called cortisol. This has been linked to increasing forgetfulness as we age.

"While we know that stress hormones affect memory, this research explains how the receptors they engage with can switch good memory to poorly-functioning memory in old age," according to Dr Joyce Yau of the University's Centre of Cardiovascular Science.

Stress hormone receptors

The study, by the University of Edinburgh, found that one receptor was activated by low levels of cortisol, which helped memory. However, once levels of this stress hormone were too high they spilled over onto a second receptor. This activates brain processes that contribute to memory impairment.

The study found that high levels of the stress hormone in aged mice made them less able to remember how to navigate a maze. The memory recall problem was reversed when the receptor linked to poor memory was blocked.

The research helps explain why too much stress over a prolonged period interferes with the normal processes in storing everyday memories.

This is despite the fact that a little bit of stress can help us better remember emotional memories.

Dr Joyce Yau said: "We now know that lowering the levels of these stress hormones will prevent them from activating a receptor in the brain that is bad for memory. Understanding the mechanisms in the brain, which affect memory as we age, will help us to find ways to combat conditions linked to memory loss."

Potential drug treatment

The researchers are currently investigating a new chemical compound which blocks an enzyme -- 11beta-HSD1 -- that is involved in producing stress hormones within cells.

They hope this could be used to develop a drug treatment to slow the normal decline in memory associated with aging or even improve memory in the already very old.

The study was funded by the Medical Research Council. This research is also supported by a Seeding Drug Discovery Award from the Wellcome Trust.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Edinburgh. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. J. L. W. Yau, J. Noble, J. R. Seckl. 11-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 1 Deficiency Prevents Memory Deficits with Aging by Switching from Glucocorticoid Receptor to Mineralocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Cognitive Control. Journal of Neuroscience, 2011; 31 (11): 4188 DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.6145-10.2011

Cite This Page:

University of Edinburgh. "Older age memory loss tied to stress hormone receptor in brain." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110406102137.htm>.
University of Edinburgh. (2011, April 6). Older age memory loss tied to stress hormone receptor in brain. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110406102137.htm
University of Edinburgh. "Older age memory loss tied to stress hormone receptor in brain." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110406102137.htm (accessed August 1, 2014).

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