Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Airway abnormalities appear uncommon in well-appearing babies with apparent life-threatening events

Date:
April 18, 2011
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
Airway abnormalities were uncommon among well-appearing infants hospitalized with apparent life-threatening events, and pediatric otolaryngology service was involved in their care only a small proportion of the time during five years after the episode, according to a new report.

Airway abnormalities were uncommon among well-appearing infants hospitalized with apparent life-threatening events, and pediatric otolaryngology service was involved in their care only a small proportion of the time during five years after the episode, according to a report in the April issue of Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

An apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) is defined as "an episode that is frightening to the observer and that is characterized by some combination of apnea (central or occasionally obstructive), color change (usually cyanotic or pallid), marked change in muscle tone, choking, or gagging," the authors write as background information in the article. "Otolaryngology evaluation has been suggested by some for the workup of patients with an ALTE."

Mark W. Willis, M.D., and colleagues at the University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, conducted a retrospective observational study to determine how often the pediatric otolaryngology service is involved in the initial care of infants with an ALTE. They assessed the usefulness of bronchoscopy and laryngoscopy (examination of the breathing passages and voice box with a lighted instrument) in diagnosing the underlying cause, and followed up the patients' outcomes over five years.

Among 471 infants with an ALTE who were included in the study, nine subsequently underwent airway evaluation by bronchoscopy, laryngoscopy, or both. Three were referred during their initial ALTE admission, and six were seen later in childhood.

"Five of nine patients had normal findings, three patients had laryngomalacia [a soft floppy voice box] (including two with laryngeal edema), and one patient had adenotonsillar hypertrophy [enlargement of the tonsils and adenoids]," the authors report.

Three of the patients ultimately underwent surgery.

"Despite the low rate of initial airway evaluation, we found no evidence of detrimental outcomes caused by a delay in referral during the ensuing five years," the authors conclude. "The results of this study suggest that pediatric otolaryngology evaluation is of low yield in well-appearing infants hospitalized for an ALTE."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Mark W. Willis; Joshua L. Bonkowsky; Rajendu Srivastava; J. Fredrik Grimmer. Usefulness of Airway Evaluation in Infants Initially Seen With an Apparent Life-Threatening Event. Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery, 2011; 137 (4): 359-362 DOI: 10.1001/archoto.2011.37

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Airway abnormalities appear uncommon in well-appearing babies with apparent life-threatening events." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110418161711.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2011, April 18). Airway abnormalities appear uncommon in well-appearing babies with apparent life-threatening events. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 27, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110418161711.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Airway abnormalities appear uncommon in well-appearing babies with apparent life-threatening events." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110418161711.htm (accessed August 27, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Predicting Heart Transplant Rejection With a Blood Test

Predicting Heart Transplant Rejection With a Blood Test

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) Now a new approach to rejection of donor organs could change the way doctors predict transplant rejection…without expensive, invasive procedures. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Better Braces That Vibrate

Better Braces That Vibrate

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) The length of time you have to keep your braces on could be cut in half thanks to a new device that speeds up the process. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smartphone App Tracks Your Heart Rate

Smartphone App Tracks Your Heart Rate

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) A new app that can track your heart rate 24/7 is available for download in your app store and its convenience could save your life. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stroke in Young Adults

Stroke in Young Adults

Ivanhoe (Aug. 27, 2014) A stroke can happen at any time and affect anyone regardless of age. This mother chose to give her son independence and continue to live a normal life after he had a stroke at 18 years old. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins