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New mitochondrial control mechanism discovered

Date:
May 4, 2011
Source:
Karolinska Institutet
Summary:
Scientists have discovered a new component of mitochondria that plays a key part in their function. The discovery is of potential significance to our understanding of both inherited and age-related diseases.

Scientists have discovered a new component of mitochondria that plays a key part in their function. The discovery, which is presented in the journal Cell Metabolism, is of potential significance to our understanding of both inherited and age-related diseases.

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Mitochondria are normally called the cell's power plants since they convert the energy in our food into a form that the body can use. To work properly, the mitochondria have to form new proteins, which they do in their ribosomes.

A group of researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Germany, has discovered that a protein called MTERF4 combines with another protein called NSUN4 to form a complex that controls the formation and function of the mitochondrial ribosomes. In mice lacking MTERF4 no functional ribosomes are formed, leading to a reduction in energy production.

"Reduced mitochondrial function is involved in several inherited diseases, normal aging and age-related diseases," says Professor Nils Gφran Larsson, who co-led the study with Professor Claes Gustafsson. "Fundamental knowledge of how mitochondrial function is regulated can therefore be of great clinical significance in the future."

The research group previously discovered similar regulation mechanisms in the mitochondria that were found to be related to the development of diabetes.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Karolinska Institutet. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Yolanda Cαmara, Jorge Asin-Cayuela, Chan Bae Park, Metodi D. Metodiev, Yonghong Shi, Benedetta Ruzzenente, Christian Kukat, Bianca Habermann, Rolf Wibom, Kjell Hultenby, Thomas Franz, Hediye Erdjument-Bromage, Paul Tempst, B. Martin Hallberg, Claes M. Gustafsson, Nils-Gφran Larsson. MTERF4 Regulates Translation by Targeting the Methyltransferase NSUN4 to the Mammalian Mitochondrial Ribosome. Cell Metabolism, 2011; 13 (5): 527-539 DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2011.04.002

Cite This Page:

Karolinska Institutet. "New mitochondrial control mechanism discovered." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110504080726.htm>.
Karolinska Institutet. (2011, May 4). New mitochondrial control mechanism discovered. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110504080726.htm
Karolinska Institutet. "New mitochondrial control mechanism discovered." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110504080726.htm (accessed November 25, 2014).

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