Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Key gene found in childhood cancer

Date:
May 5, 2011
Source:
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Summary:
Scientists have identified the Aurora A gene -- which is vital for tumor growth and known to be expressed at higher-than-normal levels in many cancers -- as a target for potential therapies for rhabdoid tumors, aggressive childhood cancers that usually strike children under three years old and affect the brain or kidneys. The disease is extremely rare and is particularly difficult to treat and almost always fatal.

There are no effective treatments for rhabdoid tumors -- aggressive childhood cancers that usually strike children under three years old and affect the brain or kidneys. The disease is extremely rare -- fewer than 10 cases are diagnosed each year in the U.S. -- but is particularly difficult to treat and almost always fatal.

Now scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have identified a target for potential therapies for these tumors: a gene called Aurora A that is vital for tumor growth. The research team was led by Ganjam Kalpana, Ph.D., professor of genetics and of microbiology & immunology, the Mark Trauner Faculty Scholar in Neuro-oncology at Einstein. Their findings appear in the April 26 online issue of Cancer Research.

The Aurora A gene is known to be expressed at higher-than-normal levels in many cancers, and its expression is associated with poor prognosis. Scientists have also known that mutations in a tumor suppressor gene called INI1/hSNF5 can lead to rhabdoid tumors. In this study, the Kalpana team found that, in rhabdoid tumors, loss of the tumor suppressor gene INI1/hSNF5 leads to changes in Aurora A's expression that are crucial for tumor growth.

In experiments involving rhabdoid tumors and tumor cell lines, the Einstein scientists showed for the first time that Aurora A is highly expressed in both human and mouse rhabdoid tumors, that the loss of the INI1/hSNF5 tumor suppressor gene from rhabdoid tumor cells leads to the "de-repression" of Aurora A, and that knocking down Aurora A's expression in rhabdoid tumor cells potently inhibits the growth of those cells.

"Our findings indicate that targeting Aurora A could be an effective strategy for halting rhabdoid tumor growth," said Dr. Kalpana. She notes that many Aurora A inhibitors are now being tested against several types of cancers, includingmelanoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and other researchers have now expressed interest in using Aurora A inhibitors in trials for children with rhabdoid brain tumors.

Seung Jae Lee, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Kalpana laboratory, is the first author of the paper and played a major role in the study. He was helped by Velasco Cimica, Ph.D., and Nandini Ramachandra, M.S., both at Einstein. David Zagzag, M.D., at New York University provided clinical samples and performed immunohistochemistry. The paper is titled "Aurora A is a Repressed Effector Target of the Chromatin Remodeling Protein INI1/hSNF5 Required for Rhabdoid Tumor Cell Survival." The research was funded with grants from the American Cancer Society, Children's Tumor Foundation, the Department of Defense, Albert Einstein Cancer Center, and the Feinberg Foundation.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Lee, V. Cimica, N. Ramachandra, D. Zagzag, G. V. Kalpana. Aurora A Is a Repressed Effector Target of the Chromatin Remodeling Protein INI1/hSNF5 Required for Rhabdoid Tumor Cell Survival. Cancer Research, 2011; 71 (9): 3225 DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-2167

Cite This Page:

Albert Einstein College of Medicine. "Key gene found in childhood cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110505124041.htm>.
Albert Einstein College of Medicine. (2011, May 5). Key gene found in childhood cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110505124041.htm
Albert Einstein College of Medicine. "Key gene found in childhood cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110505124041.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins