Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Irritable bowel syndrome: Common gastrointestinal disorder linked to bacterial overgrowth, food poisoning

Date:
May 13, 2011
Source:
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers have reported two advances in the understanding of irritable bowel syndrome, the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States, affecting an estimated 30 million people. One study provides further evidence that IBS is linked to an overgrowth of bacteria in the gut. In a separate study, a mathematical model reveals the disease's link to food poisoning and shows that military personnel are at a much higher risk for the disorder than the rest of the population.

Cedars-Sinai researchers have reported two advances in the understanding of irritable bowel syndrome, the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States, affecting an estimated 30 million people.

Related Articles


One study provides further evidence that IBS is linked to an overgrowth of bacteria in the gut. In a separate study, a mathematical model reveals the disease's link to food poisoning and shows that military personnel are at a much higher risk for the disorder than the rest of the population.

"The better we understand this disease, which affects millions of Americans, the more tools we will have for fighting it," said Mark Pimentel, MD, director of the Cedars-Sinai GI Motility Program and a primary investigator on the studies. "Patients with this condition suffer serious quality of life issues. It's a disease that is frequently misunderstood and difficult for people to talk about, but it's important for the medical community to understand the causes of the disease so we can develop the most effective treatments possible."

The findings were reported at Digestive Disease Week, the world's largest gathering of physicians and researchers in gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery. The May 7-10 conference occurred in Chicago. IBS is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States, affecting more than 20 percent of the population. Doctors commonly categorize patients with a "constipation predominant" condition, a "diarrhea-predominant" condition, or an alternating pattern of diarrhea and constipation. These patients also often experience abdominal pain or cramps, excess gas or bloating, and visible abdominal distension.

In collaboration with researchers at Sismanogleion General Hospital in Athens, Greece, and at the University of Athens, scientists looked at small bowel cultures to confirm the presence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth -- or SIBO -- in patients with IBS. Previous studies have indicated that bacteria have a role in the disease, including breath tests finding methane (a byproduct of bacterial fermentation in the gut), as well as the disease responding to antibiotics. In this study, 320 patients underwent an endoscopy of their upper GI tract, from which a small bowel culture was cultivated. Of those patients with IBS, 37.5 percent were positive for bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine, compared to fewer than 10 percent of those who did not have the disorder . The overgrowth was more prevalent in those with the diarrhea-predominant version of the disease. Researchers also found more different kinds of bacteria in IBS patients.

In a separate study, using a mathematical model, researchers concluded that food poisoning -- gastroenteritis -- may account for the majority of irritable bowel syndrome cases. Further, it predicts a greater incidence of the disease for populations at a higher risk of these kinds of infections, such as military personnel. The study was based on data from the Centers for Disease Control and other research studies. The model projects that 9 percent of those with a genetic predisposition would contract IBS after 10 years. However, among high risk groups such as deployed military, 9 percent of that population would develop the disease in a six month time frame.

"While everyone understands that our troops encounter great danger and difficult conditions while serving their country, this study reminds us that we need to pay greater attention to the dietary woes and digestive upsets that long have been the subject of wry discussion among overseas forces," Pimentel said of the study results.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Irritable bowel syndrome: Common gastrointestinal disorder linked to bacterial overgrowth, food poisoning." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110511092409.htm>.
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. (2011, May 13). Irritable bowel syndrome: Common gastrointestinal disorder linked to bacterial overgrowth, food poisoning. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110511092409.htm
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. "Irritable bowel syndrome: Common gastrointestinal disorder linked to bacterial overgrowth, food poisoning." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110511092409.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Double-Amputee Becomes First To Move Two Prosthetic Arms With His Mind

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) A double-amputee makes history by becoming the first person to wear and operate two prosthetic arms using only his mind. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins