Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Helicopters that protect fleet ships given a newfound tactical advantage

Date:
May 11, 2011
Source:
Office of Naval Research
Summary:
New technology will give helicopters such as the MH-60 and the AH-1 Cobra that protect fleet ships a newfound tactical advantage. The LCITS system enables pilots to designate a target, fire a rocket and move on to the next threat. This essentially offers a "fire and forget" capability, which means a faster response when countering threats.

When officials from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) showed up at the 63rd annual Naval Helicopter Association (NHA) Symposium in San Diego from May 9-12, they displayed a technology that allows helicopter aircraft commanders to "take the fight away from the boat."

Related Articles


The Low-Cost Imaging Terminal Seeker (LCITS) will give helicopters, such as the MH-60 and the AH-1 Cobra that protect fleet ships, a newfound tactical advantage.

The LCITS system enables pilots to designate a target, fire a rocket and move on to the next threat. This essentially offers a "fire and forget" capability, which relieves the pilot of the responsibility of guiding the weapon to the target during the time of flight, as is the case with laser-designated weapons. For pilots, that means a faster response when countering threats.

Lt. Col. Raymond Schreiner, a developmental test pilot from China Lake's Naval Air Warfare Center's Weapons Division in California, fired a prototype LCITS weapon and witnessed the LCITS' capability firsthand.

"Putting this on a helicopter gives us the ability to take the fight away from the boat," Schreiner said. "The LCITS technology appears to be well suited for engaging multiple, high-speed seaborne targets in a very short period of time."

The LCITS system comprises three main components: the algorithms that calculate targeting and transfer alignment data; a digital smart launcher; and the prototype LCITS weapon.

The system is a collaborative effort among several partners, including South Korea; the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency; the Office of the Secretary of Defense; and the Navy International Program Office, all of which helped advance its optical sensors and infrared-seeker technologies.

"The LCITs program is considered "low cost" because it is an augmentation or upgrade to a pre-existing 2.75-inch rocket system," Michael Deitchman, director of ONR's Naval Air Warfare and Weapons Department, said. "Instead of relying on costly parts, sensors and guidance systems, it relies on the aircraft systems to provide the targeting information."

LCITS is undergoing further testing as part of the Medusa Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD). Medusa JCTD's goal is to integrate the rocket onto the MH-60 aircraft platform. It will also demonstrate the LCITS' capability to defend against multiple fast-attack craft threats from various directions and ranges. Demonstrations will show the rocket system's potential to defeat these targets.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Office of Naval Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Office of Naval Research. "Helicopters that protect fleet ships given a newfound tactical advantage." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110511162526.htm>.
Office of Naval Research. (2011, May 11). Helicopters that protect fleet ships given a newfound tactical advantage. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110511162526.htm
Office of Naval Research. "Helicopters that protect fleet ships given a newfound tactical advantage." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110511162526.htm (accessed January 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Cablevision Enters Wi-Fi Phone Fray

Cablevision Enters Wi-Fi Phone Fray

Reuters - Business Video Online (Jan. 26, 2015) The entry by Cablevision and Google could intensify the already heated price wars for mobile phone service. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hector the Robot Mimics a Giant Stick Insect

Hector the Robot Mimics a Giant Stick Insect

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 26, 2015) A robot based on a stick insect can navigate difficult terrain autonomously and adapt to its surroundings. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Model Flying, Walking Drone After Vampire Bats

Scientists Model Flying, Walking Drone After Vampire Bats

Buzz60 (Jan. 26, 2015) Swiss scientists build a new drone that can both fly and walk, modeling it after the movements of common vampire bats. Jen Markham (@jenmarkham) has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Obama's Wildlife Plan Renews Alaska Drilling Debate

Obama's Wildlife Plan Renews Alaska Drilling Debate

Newsy (Jan. 26, 2015) President Obama&apos;s proposal aims to protect more land in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, but so far, all that&apos;s materialized is a war of words. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins