Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

'Clot-busters' no more effective than traditional therapy in treating lung blood clots, study finds

Date:
May 16, 2011
Source:
American Thoracic Society
Summary:
Although so-called clot-busting drugs are commonly used in the treatment of some patients with blood clots in the lungs, a new study conducted by researchers in Spain and the US indicates the agents do not appear to be any more effective than traditional blood thinners for the majority of these patients. Clot-busters, or thrombolytic agents, also appear to increase the risk of death in patients with normal blood pressure.

Although so-called clot-busting drugs are commonly used in the treatment of some patients with blood clots in the lungs, a new study conducted by researchers in Spain and the U.S. indicates the agents do not appear to be any more effective than traditional blood thinners for the majority of these patients. Clot-busters, or thrombolytic agents, also appear to increase the risk of death in patients with normal blood pressure.

Related Articles


The study was presented at the ATS 2011 International Conference in Denver.

"The results of our study do not support the use of thrombolytic, or clot-busting, agents in most patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism," said study author David Jiménez, MD, senior consultant for the respiratory department at the Ramón y Cajal Hospital and Alcalá de Henares University in Madrid.

"We also found that, compared to standard anticoagulation drugs, thrombolytic therapy demonstrated a trend toward increased survival in patients who presented with low blood pressure, while it significantly worsened survival in those without low blood pressure," said Dr. Jiménez, who is also chief of the hospital's pulmonary embolism study group.

The study utilized data from patients enrolled in the Registro Informatizado de la Enfermedad Trombo Embólica (RIETE registry), a computerized registry of patients who have blood clots, including pulmonary blood clots. The researchers reviewed the health information of 15,944 registry-enrolled patients with confirmed symptomatic acute pulmonary embolism to determine if thrombolytic therapy caused an effect on patient mortality during the first three months after diagnosis.

They found that while patients with low blood pressure who were treated with thrombolytic agents had a non-statistically significant reduction in death compared to patients treated with anticoagulants, patients who had normal blood pressure and were treated with thrombolytic drugs had a statistically significant increased risk of death compared to those who received standard anticoagulants.

"The primary finding of the study was expected, as there are no large randomized clinical trials that demonstrate the benefit of thrombolytic therapy on patient survival," Dr. Jiménez said. "However, it was surprising to note that thrombolytic therapy was associated with worsened survival in pulmonary embolism patients with stable blood pressure.

"Unless further information that suggests otherwise becomes available, the guidelines for treatment of patients with pulmonary embolism should not recommend thrombolytic therapy for patients who have normal blood pressure," he said.

Dr. Jiménez said randomized clinical trials should assess the clinical benefit of thrombolysis in selected patients with pulmonary embolism and normal blood pressure.

"Investigators also should conduct prospective studies to assess if cardiac biomarkers and/or imaging testing might identify those patients with low blood pressure who are at highest risk of death and who might benefit from thrombolytic therapy," he said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Thoracic Society. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Thoracic Society. "'Clot-busters' no more effective than traditional therapy in treating lung blood clots, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110516111650.htm>.
American Thoracic Society. (2011, May 16). 'Clot-busters' no more effective than traditional therapy in treating lung blood clots, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110516111650.htm
American Thoracic Society. "'Clot-busters' no more effective than traditional therapy in treating lung blood clots, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110516111650.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) — Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

Madagascar Working to Contain Plague Outbreak

AFP (Nov. 24, 2014) — Madagascar said Monday it is trying to contain an outbreak of plague -- similar to the Black Death that swept Medieval Europe -- that has killed 40 people and is spreading to the capital Antananarivo. Duration: 00:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Are Female Bosses More Likely To Be Depressed?

Newsy (Nov. 24, 2014) — A new study links greater authority with increased depressive symptoms among women in the workplace. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins