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Pharmacies' software systems miss potentially dangerous interactions, study finds

Date:
May 21, 2011
Source:
University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy
Summary:
Only 28 percent of pharmacies' clinical decision support software systems -- the computer programs that are in place to alert pharmacists to possible medication problems -- correctly identified potentially dangerous drug-drug interactions, according to a new study.

A study conducted at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy found that only 28 percent of pharmacies' clinical decision support software systems -- the computer programs that are in place to alert pharmacists to possible medication problems -- correctly identified potentially dangerous drug-drug interactions.

The study, published in the Journal of American Medical Informatics, was conducted at 64 pharmacies across Arizona. Members of the research team tested the pharmacy software using a set of prescription orders for a standardized fictitious patient. The prescriptions consisted of 18 different medications that posed 13 clinically significant drug-drug interactions. Of the 64 pharmacies, only 18 correctly identified all of the eligible drug-drug interactions and non-interactions.

"These findings suggest that we have a fundamental problem with the way interactions are evaluated by drug knowledge databases," says Daniel Malone, PhD, UA professor of pharmacy and lead investigator on the study. "The weakness of these systems could lead to medication errors that might harm patients. Pharmacists should become familiar with how their computer system identifies drug interactions. Consumers should always inform their doctor and pharmacist about all medications and other therapies they are using. The risk of harm from dangerous combinations can be reduced when patients create and maintain a medication list."

Other members of the UA College of Pharmacy research team were Terri Warholak, PhD, assistant professor; Lisa Hines, PharmD, clinical pharmacist; and Kim Saverno, doctoral candidate.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. K. R. Saverno, L. E. Hines, T. L. Warholak, A. J. Grizzle, L. Babits, C. Clark, A. M. Taylor, D. C. Malone. Ability of pharmacy clinical decision-support software to alert users about clinically important drug-drug interactions. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 2010; 18 (1): 32 DOI: 10.1136/jamia.2010.007609

Cite This Page:

University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy. "Pharmacies' software systems miss potentially dangerous interactions, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 May 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110517141457.htm>.
University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy. (2011, May 21). Pharmacies' software systems miss potentially dangerous interactions, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110517141457.htm
University of Arizona, College of Pharmacy. "Pharmacies' software systems miss potentially dangerous interactions, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110517141457.htm (accessed April 17, 2014).

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