Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Removal of a tiny RNA molecule can inhibit cancer growth, researchers discover

Date:
June 7, 2011
Source:
University of Louisville
Summary:
Removing a tiny RNA molecule in mice has been found to suppress carcinogenic tumor formation. Researchers discovered that the removal of a non-coding RNA molecule known as MicroRNA 21 suppressed the formation of skin tumors in mice. This molecule -- abbreviated as miR-21 -- was targeted for study because of its presence in human cancer formation.

Research from the University of Louisville report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences indicates the removal of a tiny RNA molecule in mice suppresses carcinogenic tumor formation.

Yong Li, Ph.D., associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, and his research team led by postdoctoral fellows Xiaodong Ma and Munish Kumar found that the removal of a non-coding RNA molecule known as MicroRNA 21 suppressed the formation of skin tumors in mice. This molecule -- abbreviated as miR-21 -- was targeted for study because of its presence in human cancer formation, Li said.

"In virtually all types of cancer, miR-21 is found to be present at elevated levels," Li said. "We believe it is essential to the growth of cancers."

Two groups of mice -- 18 with miR-21 removed and a control group of 23 with miR-21 intact -- were studied after skin tumors known as papillomas were induced with a heavy dose of a carcinogen. The group without miR-21 had just 1.5 tumors per mouse after 30 weeks as compared to 2.5 tumors per mouse in the control group. Moreover, one of the mice without miR-21 was tumor-free at the end of the study.

"Our work leads us to believe that miR-21 ablation (removal) increases the body's own tumor suppressing ability to hold back tumors," Li said. "The cancer research community is increasingly aware the importance of the surroundings around tumor cells. Our ongoing study of miR-21 involves looking at how this molecule contributes to tumor environment."

The study's funding indicates the serendipitous aspect of bench science, Li said, because it was not funded by a cancer research agency or organization but in part by the American Heart Association and the UofL Diabetes and Obesity Center.

"We began our work in 2008 with the hypothesis that miR-21 plays a role in cardiovascular disease and diabetes," he said. "However, our research and reports from other groups suggest it does not, although we are continuing our work in these areas.

"Funding basic research is important because you never know where science will take you. It is clear from our research that miR-21 is taking us a bit closer to understanding tumor formation."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Louisville. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. X. Ma, M. Kumar, S. N. Choudhury, L. E. Becker Buscaglia, J. R. Barker, K. Kanakamedala, M.-F. Liu, Y. Li. Loss of the miR-21 allele elevates the expression of its target genes and reduces tumorigenesis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2011; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1103735108

Cite This Page:

University of Louisville. "Removal of a tiny RNA molecule can inhibit cancer growth, researchers discover." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110606152202.htm>.
University of Louisville. (2011, June 7). Removal of a tiny RNA molecule can inhibit cancer growth, researchers discover. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110606152202.htm
University of Louisville. "Removal of a tiny RNA molecule can inhibit cancer growth, researchers discover." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110606152202.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

How 'Yes Means Yes' Defines Sexual Assault

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Aimed at reducing sexual assaults on college campuses, California has adopted a new law changing the standard of consent for sexual activity. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Scientists May Have Found An Early Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Newsy (Sep. 29, 2014) Researchers looked at 1,500 blood samples and determined people who developed pancreatic cancer had more branched chain amino acids. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

Colo. Doctors See Cluster of Enterovirus Cases

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

Dr.'s Unsure of Cause of Fast-Spreading Virus

AP (Sep. 29, 2014) Doctors at the Children's Hospital of Colorado say they have treated over 4,000 children with serious respiratory illnesses since August. Nine of the patients have shown distinct neurological symptoms, including limb weakness. (Sept. 29) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins