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New technique doubles breast size using patient's own fat

Date:
June 7, 2011
Source:
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Summary:
A plastic surgery procedure in which the patient's own fat is transplanted to the breasts -- used along with treatment to expand the breast tissue before surgery -- can achieve up to a twofold increase in breast size, according to a new study.

A plastic surgery procedure in which the patient's own fat is transplanted to the breasts -- used along with treatment to expand the breast tissue before surgery -- can achieve up to a twofold increase in breast size, according to a study in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

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The procedure builds on previous fat transfer techniques to provide excellent outcomes of breast enhancement surgery. "Pre-expansion to the breast allows for mega-volume (over 300 cc) grafting with reproducible, long lasting results that can be achieved in less than two hours," according to Drs. Daniel Alexander Del Vecchio and Louis Paul Bucky, authors of the new report.

"Pre-Expansion" Maximizes Results of Breast Fat Transfer

The technique is an adaptation of the increasingly popular autologous fat transplantation technique. In these procedures, fat obtained by liposuction from one part of the body -- for example, the thighs -- is transferred for use in breast enlargement and reshaping.

In the procedure used by Drs. Del Vecchio and Bucky, the patient first undergoes several weeks of "pre-expansion" treatment. This is done with a bra-like device that uses gentle negative pressure to gradually expand the breast. The pre-expansion procedure provides extra room in the breast, which is "backfilled" using the liposuctioned fat.

The authors report their experience using pre-expansion and autologous fat transfer in 46 breasts of 25 women. Some of the patients wanted to increase their breast size or to replace implants; others were seeking treatment for certain types of breast deformities. On average, about 300cc of fat was transplanted per treated breast.

When evaluated after six months, the women had significant improvements in breast size and shape. On average, the treated breasts approximately doubled in size, with a "soft and natural…appearance and feel," the researchers write. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans showed no cysts, masses or other abnormalities.

As they gained experience, the surgeons were able to perform the breast fat transfer procedure within less than two hours. There were no significant complications.

While the idea of breast fat transfer is not new, it has seen a resurgence in recent years, with several plastic surgery groups reporting good results. Drs. Del Vecchio and Bucky believe pre-transplant breast expansion is an important technical advance, providing increased space to be occupied by the patient's own fat. Patients also used the vacuum device for a few weeks after the procedure, which may act as a "splint" to help promote healing.

Further research will be needed to assess the results of the pre-expansion and fat transplantation technique -- including not only the long-term outcomes, but also important safety issues. As reported in recent issues of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, there is some question as to whether breast fat transfer procedures interfere with mammographic screening for breast cancer.

In the meantime, Drs. Del Vecchio and Bucky believe their results -- a two-fold increase in breast size, achieved in two hours or less -- are a significant step forward in the use of autologous fat transplantation for breast enhancement. They conclude, "These results serve as a standard to objectively compare other techniques of fat grafting to the breast in the future."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. "New technique doubles breast size using patient's own fat." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110607120558.htm>.
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. (2011, June 7). New technique doubles breast size using patient's own fat. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110607120558.htm
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. "New technique doubles breast size using patient's own fat." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110607120558.htm (accessed November 22, 2014).

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