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Unique 'portrait' of shuttle and International Space Station released

Date:
June 9, 2011
Source:
NASA
Summary:
Newly-released portraits show the International Space Station together with the space shuttle, the vehicle that helped build the complex during the last decade. The pictures are the first taken of a shuttle docked to the station from the perspective of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft.
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This image of the International Space Station and the docked space shuttle Endeavour, flying at an altitude of approximately 220 miles, was taken by Expedition 27 crew member Paolo Nespoli from the Soyuz TMA-20 following its undocking on May 23, 2011 (USA time). The pictures taken by Nespoli are the first taken of a shuttle docked to the International Space Station from the perspective of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft. Onboard the Soyuz were Russian cosmonaut and Expedition 27 commander Dmitry Kondratyev; Nespoli, a European Space Agency astronaut; and NASA astronaut Cady Coleman. Coleman and Nespoli were both flight engineers. The three landed in Kazakhstan later that day, completing 159 days in space.
Credit: NASA

Newly-released portraits show the International Space Station together with the space shuttle, the vehicle that helped build the complex during the last decade. The pictures are the first taken of a shuttle docked to the station from the perspective of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft.

On May 23, the Soyuz was carrying Russian cosmonaut Dmitry Kondratyev, NASA astronaut Cady Coleman and European Space Agency astronaut Paolo Nespoli back to Earth. Once their vehicle was about 600 feet from the station, Mission Control Moscow, outside the Russian capital, commanded the orbiting laboratory to rotate 130 degrees. This move allowed Nespoli to capture digital photographs and high definition video of shuttle Endeavour docked to the station.

The Soyuz landed in Kazakhstan and was taken to Moscow for routine post-landing analysis. NASA and the Russian space agency, Roscosmos, then processed the imagery as part of the standard disposition of spacecraft cargo.

Additional images and high definition video are being processed and will be posted on NASA's website. To view the still images, visit: http://go.nasa.gov/stationportrait

For information about the International Space Station, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/station


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by NASA. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

NASA. "Unique 'portrait' of shuttle and International Space Station released." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 June 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110609145818.htm>.
NASA. (2011, June 9). Unique 'portrait' of shuttle and International Space Station released. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 2, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110609145818.htm
NASA. "Unique 'portrait' of shuttle and International Space Station released." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/06/110609145818.htm (accessed August 2, 2015).

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